Medicine and Pharmaceuticals

Early and swift intervention with an automated external defibrillator (AED) amidst sudden out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) during bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) saves lives—in fact, doubles the likelihood of survival. (1) We know this. There is data to support this. So, why is their usage so low?

The problems: Cost, Availability and High Variability of Place and Time of OHCA occurrence. 

A team of University of Toronto researchers critical of prior efforts to guide policy of public AED placement around too broadly defined location categories without consideration of accessibility decided to explore a way to rank specific businesses and municipal locales to maximize OHCA coverage with AEDs....

If you follow healthcare news, you know that millions of US pain patients are experiencing a world of troubles.  If their pain itself wasn’t enough, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention added to their agony in March 2016 by issuing a restrictive “Guideline” to primary care physicians on prescription of opioid medications to adults with long-lasting non-cancer pain. 

The Guideline was phrased as advisory rather than mandatory.  But that distinction quickly got lost as the US Drug Enforcement Administration ramped up disciplinary proceedings and prosecution of doctors for “over-prescribing” opioids like OxyContin and hydrocodone.  Even before final publication, Congress made the Guideline...

In science and medicine, much of the time there is no "right" answer. Different doctors will have different approaches to a given condition, a drug that may be great for one person may make another ill, and two surgeons—even in the same specialty—may have different opinions about what kind of surgery needs to be done, if any. Because of the differences in their training and experience, physicians will have a different interpretation of the risk and benefit of a therapy or procedure.

This type of uncertainty is one of the things that makes science and medicine fascinating, but also makes them overwhelming and confusing, even to the most knowledgeable laypeople. Few people have the ability to make an informed decision about what is best for them, so they turn to someone they trust...

A ten month-old baby girl – called Dominique – born with two spines and four legs traveled from the Ivory Coast to Chicago to cross paths with a team of care givers who would successfully operate on her in a six-hour surgery. The coordinated effort required five surgeons and fifty clinicians.

Concerned over lack of intervention leading to undesirable complications like paralysis, the medical crew reportedly removed the accessory appendages without event and the patient is thriving by all accounts. In this case, the anomaly is the consequence of a parasitic twin. "A parasitic twin is an identical twin that fails to fully separate in development," said...

Last January I wrote an article called "Kratom: The Supplement That Will Kill Godzilla," using hyperbole to point out that the supplement/drug (combination of drugs, really) was not a benign substance, nor a simple, risk-free herb. The increase in poison control center calls (see graph at bottom) was not without reason .

I used the table below to indicate some of the receptors that components of the drug were known to interact with. The key point was to demonstrate that mitragynine, the principal alkaloid (1) in kratom, which we call a "dirty drug"—one that acts at multiple receptors—is a psychotropic cocktail, which, like any other drug that alters brain function,...

The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) just published distressing accounts of three patients who endured irreparable damage to their vision after seeking treatment at the same unnamed “stem cell” clinic in Broward, Florida.

Shortly, we will address where things went very, very wrong and how such situations can be avoided. But, first, let’s discuss what happened.

The women aged 72-88 years old suffered blindness to near blindness as a direct result of untested “stem cell” therapies being injected into their eyes while being fleeced $5000 for the procedures. Promised “revolutionary” therapy, they were left with catastrophic reminders of the unfortunate and unnecessary ordeal.

Each patient had age-...

There is this unsubstantiated, but widely believed, notion that vitamins and supplements are a panacea. In fact, a multi-billion dollar industry serves to support and perpetuate this often faulty, overly auspicious claim.

Here, I will tackle the true level of importance of the “sunshine” Vitamin D in staving off disease, preserving healthy bones and the actual hazards of deficiency and toxicity.

Why? Because, according to Britain’s leading testing laboratory, excessive exogenous ingestion to overdose levels of Vitamin D supplements purchased online reveal some people are taking 2,250 times the recommended dosages. Such endeavors...

What doctors long feared, and what alternative medicine proponents have long desired, has come to pass. More academic medical centers, which lay claim to being superior, have been embracing alternative techniques that, unlike actual medicine, have never passed double-blind clinical trials.

In 1999, only 8 academic centers embraced the alternative to evidence-based medicine. Now that is over 70, including everything from vague "wellness" notions to naturopathy.

In the Stat News special report, they note that the reason is financial - but real doctors are less happy about things such as “alternative therapies promoted as a way to treat disease...

Dr. Cox: Did you actually just page me to find out how much Tylenol to give to Mrs. Lendsner?

J.D.: I was worried that it could exacerbate the patient's... 

Dr. Cox: It's regular strength Tylenol. Here's what-chya do: Get her to open her mouth, take a handful, and throw it at her. Whatever sticks, that's the correct dosage.

Of Dr. Cox's many rants on the comedy show Scrubs, this is definitely one of the funnier and more memorable1. However, it isn't quite accurate.

Tylenol (a.k.a. acetaminophen or paracetamol2), unbeknownst to many, is actually a fairly toxic drug. Its ubiquity has lulled us into a false sense of security about its safety. But as our resident chemist Dr. Josh Bloom...

A number of recent headlines imply a case study just published in the New England Journal of Medicine proves that gene therapy has cured sickle cell disease—a genetic disorder that incurs tremendous pain, suffering and diminished life expectancy. Here, we will unpack the significance of the researchers’ findings.

First, let’s address why this news could be so groundbreaking to those afflicted and their loved ones.

Sickle Cell Disease is an inherited condition that causes a mutated hemoglobin—the protein within red blood cells (RBCs) that carries oxygen for delivery to vital tissues. Oxygen feeds our organs so they can stay healthy and perform their respective jobs. This Hemoglobin S (aka Sickle...