Nutrition and Lifestyle

In honor of St. Patrick's Day, Krispy Kreme is covering their doughnuts in green glaze. That's right - they are making green doughnuts.  

This made us here at ACSH wonder.... why are we turning our junk food green when we have plenty of great green foods available already? And, what makes food that is green everyday - not just on St. Patrick's Day - so great? 

Green foods that are naturally green (without green icing) like leafy vegetables (collards, mustard greens, turnip greens, chard, spinach, and kale) are rich in vitamins A, C, E, and K. They are also high in folate which is critical during prenatal care to prevent birth defects. Additionally, broccoli and bok choy have B-vitamins. So, there is no need to buy those expensive bottles of pills at GNC to get your...

Tom Brady is one of the best (or the best) quarterbacks to ever play the game. On top of that, he is rich and hot and married to Gisele Bündchen, who is richer and hotter. 

The couple seem to have it all - and now the online meal delivery service of pre-packaged plant-based foods, Purple Carrot, is selling the idea that you can too. It's as easy as subscribing to their newly launched meal service called TB12 Performance Meals - developed directly with Tom Brady.

Brady's diet has become a hot button issue for his fans and critics alike - in large part because of his self- proclaimed belief that it has been one of the cornerstones of his athletic success. On the Purple...

If you'd  like to play Russian roulette, but don't have a loaded gun handy, you could also try drinking raw milk. True, the chances are less loaded against you, but can still be as devastating, as evidenced by a recent outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes food poisoning attributed to a creamery in Walton, New York that specializes in unpasteurized milk products. The CDC "estimates that Listeria infection is the third leading cause of death from food poisoning in the United States. About 1,600 people get sick from Listeria each year, and about 260 die."

This particular bacteria is a nasty customer — unlike many other bugs, it can survive and grow in refrigerator temperatures, so a...

Gluten-free is one of the latest food fads to take America by storm — but does everyone who espouses a gluten-free diet really need one? Certainly, someone with celiac disease must have a gluten-free diet; but there are also other reasons a person might legitimately avoid gluten, such a a non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) or an allergy. How does one know? A recent study in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology sought to examine how reliably such determinations are made.

Dr. Javier Molina-Infante from the Hospital Universitario San...

What do you say when a pretty wacky idea is ostensibly promoted by a well-respected scientist? Well, you (politely) have to say that the idea is rather wacky. The idea I'm thinking of was suggested by leading neuroscientist Wolfram Schultz of Cambridge University. Professor Schultz' research has focused on the roles and activities of brain neurotransmitters, and one of them, dopamine, is reportedly the basis for this latest idea.

And the suggestion is to combat obesity by mandating that fast foods and so-called "junk foods" be packaged in plain brown wrappers, much as pornography used to be in more discreet times. So...

It's that time of the year when the Environmental Working Group produces its "Dirty Dozen List" - foods they believe you should fear the most.

That's bad news for farmers and certainly poor people in America. Because even if you score 99.9% on this test, you could still fail. That reason is because EWG creates a Bell Curve for food.

Each year, as part of the Pesticide Data Program, the USDA engages in random sampling of pesticide residues to confirm the safety of food, and each year the EWG takes their results and manipulates the findings to claim just the opposite. But for a lot longer than the USDA has been testing for pesticides, we have known that 'the dose makes the poison.' We're now in a world...

Sure, we all know that it's important to be physically active to help achieve and maintain a healthy body weight and perhaps diminish the risk of heart disease, some cancers and overall mortality. But how much is enough? Does one really have to exercise 5 days per week, 30 minutes at a clip to accrue health benefits, and does that exercise have to be vigorous or will a brisk walk suffice? The World Health Organization recommends:

  • Adults aged 18–64 should do at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity throughout the week or do at least 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity throughout the week or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity...

Here we go again:

From Yahoo: Bacon, soda & too few nuts tied to big portion of US deaths

From NBC: These 10 Foods Affect Your Risk of Heart Disease the Most - Just 10 foods account for nearly half of all heart disease deaths in the U.S., researchers reported Tuesday.

From Reuters: Poor diet tied to...

In a recent documentary, religion scholar Reza Aslan ate a small piece of human brains. That was inadvisable.

The purpose of his six-episode CNN series "Believer," according to the Los Angeles Times, is to explore misunderstood faiths. Of course, given the choice of good journalism or sensationalism, Dr. Aslan chose the latter. In one episode, he hung out with the Aghoris, a small, fringe Hindu cult with extremely bizarre practices that are meant as a rebuke to...

They're "hooking" up.

They've got more access to safe-sex and birth-control information – at their fingertips via their smartphone – than any generation in human history.

They've got access to a tech-filled world of dating apps that can produce a prospective partner in as little time as it takes to hail an Uber.

So, naturally, Millennials are having more sex than anyone their age has had in recent years, right?

Wrong. Just the opposite.

That's according to a new study published this week, which found that Americans are having less sex now than in generations past – which includes Millennials having less than those at the same age of the previous generation, a conclusion from a previous ...