Environmental Working Group

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) uses an authoritative sounding name to peddle scientific half-truths and outright fabrications. Along with Greenpeace and PETA, it is beloved by activists but detested by scientists.

Several years ago, George Mason University surveyed 937 members of the Society of Toxicology, an association of professional toxicologists. Nearly 4 out of 5 (79%) of those responding said that EWG -- as well as the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) -- overstate the health risks of chemicals.

Despite this vote of no confidence in EWG by the scientific...

Spring is just around the corner, and with it comes another growing season. Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables can help lower calorie intake; reduce risks for heart disease, obesity and Type 2 diabetes; and protect against certain cancers.

With all these benefits, why do some consumers choose to avoid produce? Approximately three-quarters of people in the U.S. don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables, according to the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

A lot of factors could explain the shortfall, including fear. Media stories about topics such as GMOs and pesticides may convince some consumers that it’s not safe to eat certain fruits and vegetables. There’s no question that negative news...

It's that time of year again. Flowers are beginning to bloom, trees are turning green, the birds are chirping a little louder ... and the Environmental Working Group is scaring you about perfectly safe and healthy food. 

Once again, the EWG has released its annual "Dirty Dozen," a list of fresh produce found in grocery stores all over America that EWG thinks is killing you1. And like obliging lap dogs, the media -- as always, without fail, every single year -- reported the results of the "study" without even the slightest shred of criticism or critical thinking.

So, what is killing us this year? Strawberries are #1. Spinach is #2. Spinach! The upside is that if you're the sort of person who doesn't like spinach, now you can point to some pseudoscience that...

Screen Shot 2015-05-26 at 2.09.01 PMWe at ACSH operate on a tight budget, but somehow managed to scrape up enough money to buy our good friends over at the Environmental Working Group an oversized beach umbrella. It would seem that they have been out in the sun too long, and are not thinking especially clearly about a summertime issue: How to protect yourself from getting too much sun.

If you take them seriously, you better start saving up for a submarine, cause it s dangerous up here.

Why? The group has issued a statement, which says that you are all going to die. But if you use sunscreen,...

Heart-HealthyFor years the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has been publishing its lists of vegetables and fruits that supposedly are contaminated with the largest amounts of pesticides. Although the greatest preponderance of the produce samples have only very low traces of pesticides, EWG loudly trumpets which ones are most affected, with the implication, of course, that these should be avoided or at least that organic versions should be used. Their implication, of course, is that organic produce has fewer pesticide residues, although they have never listed those approved for use on organic produce.

Now, the...

Dietary satd. fatAccording to a report in the New York Times, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has released its latest masterpiece of misdirection an 80,000 item database of foods that purports to help consumers decide which foods are most healthful. Not only does the group rate foods on their nutrient content (information the nutrition facts label already provides) , but they also factor in the presence of ingredients they assume to be deleterious. That s a big part of the problem with their...

Dr. Josh Bloom on Science 2.0, February 19, 2014.

Wherever he is, Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim a/k/a Paracelsus must be doing the Foxtrot in his grave. Because somehow a bunch of dopes have managed to correct something...[Read more].

In November 1999, the Environmental Working Group (EWG), an environmental organization, issued a memorandum entitled "Tap Water in 38 Central California Cities Tainted with Banned Pesticide Some Bottle-Fed Infants May Exceed 'Safe' Dose Before Age 1" (EWG, 1999). They determined that 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP; CAS #96-12-8), a nematocide whose use was discontinued more than 20 years ago, still exists in drinking water at concentrations that they assert may pose a health risk to humans, particularly infants and young children. In an effort to analyze the validity and accuracy of the EWG report, the American Council on Science and Health has reviewed the scientific data on DBCP and presents below its...

New York, NY January 30, 1998. In a new report on pesticide residues on America's fruits and vegetables, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has twisted data and misinterpreted basic scientific information in a way calculated to provoke fear among America's parents. This was the conclusion of the American Council on Science and Health (ACSH), a consortium of over 250 leading scientists and physicians.

A look at this latest EWG report makes clear why consumers should view that organization and its reports with skepticism. The EWG an environmental group, not a health group has put its scientifically unwarranted wish for a pesticide-free environment above the very real public-health goal of increasing America's consumption of fresh fruit.

The EWG has released a "study"...

New York, NY January 30, 1998. In a new report on pesticide residues on America's fruits and vegetables, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has twisted data and misinterpreted basic scientific information in a way calculated to provoke fear among America's parents. This was the conclusion of the American Council on Science and Health (ACSH), a consortium of over 250 leading scientists and physicians.

A look at this latest EWG report makes clear why consumers should view that organization and its reports with skepticism. The EWG an environmental group, not a health group has put its scientifically unwarranted wish for a pesticide-free environment above the very real public-health goal of increasing America's consumption of fresh fruit.

The EWG has released a "study"...