IARC

When did school lunches become so contentious that law suits are filed over the processes used in their ingredients? True - they have never had fresh sushi or hand-crafted ravioli, but at a cost of about $2.50, what can we expect? 

Children are eating in the middle of their school day, which is important to sustain learning - despite what Mick Mulvaney, Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) says. Most importantly, for some children, that tray contains the only healthy, nutritious meal that is ever routinely put in front of them.

However, some groups disagree that regular school lunches are healthy at all. For example, the ...

Sometimes, things just don't make sense. Recommendations on what causes cancer should not be one of them. However, most major news outlets ran headlines this past June claiming that "hot drinks probably cause cancer" based on a letter that the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) published in the Lancet.

But, when you take a minute, (before we all start drinking our coffee lukewarm) and take a look into the letter, it becomes apparent that there is no science that supports this statement.

The majority of the letter is concerned with whether coffee causes cancer or not (it doesn't.) The last time that coffee was reviewed by IARC was in 1991, when it was classified as “...

shutterstock_183195284 Formaldehyde Structure via Shutterstock

I wish that when I was a student of anatomy I could have argued my way out of dissecting stinky cadavers and I would have had a friend in Jennifer Sass, an alarmist who blogs for the Natural Resources Defense Council. She sounds off on a recent report published by the...

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Cornfield via Shutterstock

No matter how many times its claims are rebuffed, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) continues to assert that various chemicals are, at least to some extent, carcinogenic.

One of its latest incorrect...

coffee cancerIf you were laughing at the notion that sausage is just as carcinogenic as cigarettes, you are not alone the United Nations World Health Organization (WHO) is scrambling to repair the damage to what's left of the credibility of its International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) after its latest paper about processed meat. But that report is...

Roundup:glyphosateGiven the mainstream media's devotion to sensationalism when discussing GMOs, it was an unexpected pleasure to come across a recent Washington Post article on the subject.

The essay was entitled "It's the chemical Monsanto depends on. How dangerous is it?" This is such an important topic/question from so many points of view that it should be essential...

iarc-gradedThanks to Angela Logomasini s Safe Chemical Policy News, we learned of another academic organization s disdain for the methods used by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), an arm of the WHO, in their process of evaluating the widely-used herbicide, glyphosate, among other pesticides.

Better known as Roundup by Monsanto, glyphosate has been increasingly used subsequent to the development of GMOs resistant to the chemical: such plants are roundup-ready, being immune to its weed-killing...

International_Centre_for_Research_on_Cancer_(IARC)_Headquarters_ExteriorThis month s meeting in Lyon, France, of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) the branch of the UN s World Health Organization that studies the relationship between environmental and lifestyle risk factors and cancer focused on pesticides. The committee concluded that of the five pesticides evaluated, three were probably carcinogenic, a 2A classification, despite the fact that neither the U.S. EPA nor the European Chemical Agency had classified these pesticides as such. A...