PSA screening

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recently released a 2017 draft recommendation statement on screening for prostate cancer which is based on systematic evidence review and assessment— updated from their prior 2012 version. As indicated by the authors’ viewpoint published in JAMA, the goal of this release is to raise awareness of newly acquired data on the topic while inviting review and commentary before the report is officially finalized. (1)

Because there was concern that universal PSA (aka prostate-specific antigen, a blood test) population screening often...

chemotherapy

Man s best friend has long been admired for their remarkable sense of smell. From Sherlock Holmes to the TSA, the canine olfactory system has been directed by humans to detect a long list of items, including bodies, bed bugs and bombs. Now researchers in Europe want to add another item: Cancer.

A study published in this month s Journal of Urology outlines a better than 90% effectiveness of dogs at detecting prostate cancer by sniffing a patient s urine. The researchers, based in Italy, trained two 3-year-old female...

chemotherapyIn an opinion piece published in today s New York Times, Dr. Richard J. Ablin addresses the serious problems with prostate cancer screening. Dr. Ablin discovered the prostate-specific antigen, or PSA, in 1970 (although widespread PSA screening didn t become routine until the 1990s) and it is now the most widely used tool in prostate screenings. However, there is a growing concern that the PSA test has led to overdiagnosis and overtreatment.

While it is true that prostate cancer is the most commonly-diagnosed...

chemotherapyProstate-specific antigen (PSA) screening is a commonly ordered test, despite it s being a highly debated public health practice, and despite recent recommendations which continue to condemn the screening strategy. However, despite the US Preventive Services Task Force s (USPSTF) and other experts recommendations against routine screening, a considerable number of men are still undergoing PSA screening. The inordinately high screening rates may be due to the fact that men believe there is no downside to screening. Sadly, many doctors cling to this disproven concept.

Now,...

1314902_99313658Just as women under the age of 50 are excessively screened for breast cancer using mammograms, frivolous prostate specific antigen (PSA) screening for men 75 or older goes against the grain, despite clinical guidelines suggesting otherwise.

Recent findings, published in JAMA, show 41 percent of about 61,000 men 75 or older routinely received PSA screening, with nearly 30 percent of the screenings ordered by their primary care physicians. In fact...