vaccines

It's impossible to keep up with every "alternative fact" or crazy conspiracy theory on the Internet. By the time a lie has circled the globe, the Truth has just put its shoes on1. For some reason, people find falsehoods much more entertaining and believable than the truth.

I thought that I had heard every possible vaccine conspiracy theory out there: Vaccines cause autism. Vaccines aren't necessary and are pushed on us by greedy pharmaceutical companies. Vaccines are used for mind control. Bill Gates is using vaccines to control the human population.

So, even I was slightly surprised to discover yet another vaccine conspiracy theory. A couple days ago on Facebook, I came across the following comment:

"The key to surviving the flu is to get a...

There have been a few images in the news in the past few years that have made tears roll down my face as soon as I saw them. I don't have even to say what they were - you know already.

One was a photo from this past week - of Abdul Hameed al-Yousef holding his twin babies, Aya and Ahmed, who were among the 86 people killed in the gas attack in Khan Sheikhoun, Syria.

Even as someone who is almost never without something to say - I was left speechless and had to catch my breath at the sadness, the loss, the devastation, the inhumanity. That photo will, most certainly, haunt everyone who saw it.

It is hard to find something to compare the tragedy of deaths in Syria too. But, Mike Adams, the 'Health Ranger', figured out a way to not only exploit the people who were...

The HPV vaccine has been the subject of some controversy in the United States. Some public health officials (and pharmaceutical companies) would like the vaccine to be mandatory, but since the recommended age is pre-teen, some parents fear this sends a bad message about sexual activity in an already over-sexualized culture.

Both sides make flawed arguments. The bottom line is the vaccine prevents cancer.

Human papillomavirus is definitely a scourge. It causes 99% of cervical cancers in women, and it is also behind an increase in head and neck cancers, mostly in younger white people (i.e., those in their 40s and 50s). While...

Today, in a world where important information is shared using only 140 characters, when someone sits down to write a letter, it tends to mean something. When that letter is signed by over 350 national organizations, the message is important. 

This past Tuesday, President Trump received a letter drafted by the American Academy of Pediatrics - with the one message that vaccines are safe. The letter was sent in response to an ongoing concern that President Trump is not only personally against vaccines,...

Every year, the recommended childhood and adolescent vaccine schedules are reviewed, adjusted and approved by the following governing bodies:  American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP),  and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

The 2017 revisions are now published for those 0 to 18 years of age with some of the recent changes listed here—see “notes” section for accessing complete information:

Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine

This vaccine protects against certain strains of the...

Good news. Important information on vaccines is getting through to Americans – and that's a big win for science and public health in the United States.

New data released today shows that more than eight in ten "support requiring all healthy schoolchildren to be vaccinated for measles, mumps and rubella." In addition, an overwhelming number of adults – 88 percent – "believe that the benefits of these inoculations outweigh the risks."

Results of a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center before the November elections show that 82 percent of Americans believe in the benefits of childhood vaccinations. Additionally, the survey revealed that...

If Donald Trump's anti-vaccine tweets were not enough to make the scientific and medical community nervous about the future of vaccination in this country, there is now a new reason to be concerned. Very concerned. 

It is reported that Donald Trump met this week with Robert Kennedy Jr., a vaccine denier and one of the most outspoken proponents of the false claim that vaccines cause autism. At the core of RFK Jr.'s irrational and harmful platform is the use of the preservative thimerosal in vaccines. Just two years ago, he edited the book, "Thimerosal: Let the Science Speak: The Evidence Supporting the Immediate Removal of Mercury--a Known Neurotoxin--from...

In a span of 72 hours, the Cleveland Clinic has fallen from being regarded as one of the top medical institutions in the country to a near 'trending topic' on twitter (and the hashtags are not good.)

At the center of the backlash is a blog post written by the medical director and chief operating officer of the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, Dr. Daniel Neides. The details of the post have been described, and appropriately challenged, in full detail by our own Dr. Josh Bloom in his article, The Fool at The Cleveland Clinic.  

In essence, the blog post was a bunch of anti-science quackery as Dr. Neides opined on toxins, chemicals and food.

But, what caught people's...

Perhaps the strangest medical phenomenon discovered in recent years is a link between the lone star tick and an allergy to red meat.

The bite of a lone star tick exposes a person to a small carbohydrate called alpha-gal. In a handful of people, this exposure elicits an abnormal immune response that produces a type of antibody called IgE, which causes allergies. Because red meat also contains alpha-gal, people who have been sensitized to the carbohydrate from a tick bite can develop life-threatening anaphylaxis if they consume pork or beef. 

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Andrew Wakefield, Jenny McCarthy and their anti-vaccination groupies are making less and less of an impact, according to a new report released by the CDC that analyzes vaccination data on Kindergartners.  

The CDC collected vaccination data from the beginning of the 2015-2016 school year, and the results look like a win for medicine. The data collected looked at the rates of vaccination for three vaccines - the first two doses of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, the diptheria, tetanus and pertussis (whopping cough) (DTaP) vaccine and the two doses of the varicella zoster (chicken pox) vaccine (for the 42 states that require it.)

For each vaccine, the percentage of vaccinated...