News and Views

New polling data from Pew shows that most Americans don't consume any science news whatsoever. Given how out of step the American public is with scientists over many key issues -- from the safety of GMOs to vaccines -- this probably doesn't come as much of a surprise.

According to the poll, 17% of Americans are active science news consumers, while 36% come across science news at least a few times per week. (Obviously, that means 64% do not, which is concerning in an age where science and technology affect much of our daily lives.)

What does come as...

When a medical emergency occurs, of course getting to the hospital quickly is critical. Finding transportation is of the utmost importance, and the clock is ticking. 

That said, new research indicates that getting an ambulance in all circumstances may not always be the best decision. In fact, it has the potential to be tragic.

While using Emergency Medical Services is absolutely the right move in some situations – heart attacks and breathing constrictions, for example – for others, those involving victims with "penetrating injuries" like gunshot wounds and stabbings, waiting for an ambulance's arrival might be a fatal mistake. 

New research published online today in JAMA Surgery...

For most of us, the word “doctor” in the health care setting tends to conjure up a person who completed college, innumerable pre-med requirements, medical school, internship, residency and possibly specialty fellowship (sometimes more than one). It implies a long road that ranges more than a decade, inclusive of countless board examinations with continued recertification, annual mandatory continuing medical education credits and accounts for exposure to the most clinical hours of other staff personnel in breadth, depth and scope.

It is this description that we think of when the individual responsible for our care in the hospital or an emergency room or outpatient facility interacts with us. They are no better than any other caregiver albeit a nurse, respiratory therapist or you-...

There are not a lot of people who I would run 26.2 miles for.

However, the team of scientists and physicians at the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University Medical Center are some of them. They are world leaders in the research and treatment of celiac disease and also happen to be my son's physicians. They have helped him become the healthy boy that he is today and there is no end to my gratitude for them. 

So, when they set up a team to run this year's NYC marathon in November, I put on my sneakers. Embarking on this challenge has brought some new experiences. One of which is sore legs - really sore legs. 

In looking for some advice, I turned to the first place I could think of - running websites. And, on those running websites I found one universal...

Just in case any parents out there were worried their precious offspring would cease being babes in the nest, they can rest assured as it would seem they have a few more years yet.   

A recent study conducted by researchers at San Diego State University and Bryn Mawr College, published in the journal Child Development, reveals data showing that kids are taking longer to grow up. In categories such as obtaining a paying job, driving, having sex, and drinking, this new generation of teens are less Fast Times at Ridgemont High and more Hogwarts.

The authors write that in modern U.S. culture, certain activities are rarely or never performed by children but are...

The peer review process works - but it isn't perfect. 

It's complicated, but, the process relies on its practitioners to spend large amounts of time and energy critiquing each others work in a thoughtful, meaningful and honest way. Peer review relies on human knowledge and ethics and, like humans, is flawed.

Last week, researchers and others took three days out of their busy schedules to travel to Chicago to think critically about the peer review process and ultimately, improve it. The meeting is called the Peer Review Congress (Eighth International Congress on Peer Review and Scientific Publication). The meeting, organized by The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and the BMJ has been held every four years since 1989. The motto of the meeting is to: ...

Among the reverberating issues post-Hurricane Irma created is a particularly disturbing one: multiple deaths at a Florida nursing home. Now under investigation, The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, having lost air conditioning, became a man-made sweltering environment which proved to be fatal.

This article will explore why those over 65 are especially susceptible to such scorching conditions. Litigating the liability of the Center is outside the scope of what will be discussed. 

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Being tan has a slimming effect and makes people look and feel great.  Well, turning fat brown can actually make people thin.

We have long known that there are two types of fat – white and brown.  The white fat stores energy in the form of triglycerides whereas brown fat actually takes energy and turns it into heat.  It is present in abundance in infants (to keep them warm) and decreases in prevalence as we age.  Brown fat is richly supplied with capillaries and gets its color from the iron-laden mitochondria, providing oxygen and nutrients to surrounding tissues. 

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center and University of North Carolina have developed a ...

The media has been having a field day with a recently published paper. That's not atypical when a scientific paper has a splashy result. Big scientific discoveries deserve a lot of attention. 

The problem is that this paper is not a big scientific discovery. In fact, it is somewhat surprising that it was published in the journal that it was (Vaccine) - let alone be written up in major newspapers. 

The headlines say that the paper shows a link between pregnant women receiving the flu vaccine in the first trimester and miscarriages. Regardless of the quality of the science, this will almost certainly result in two things. The first is that pregnant women will second guess getting their flu vaccine - and potentially other vaccines as well. The second is that the anti-vaxx ...

Singer Selena Gomez just published to her Instagram account that she was the recipient of a kidney transplant. The 25 year-old previously revealed her Lupus diagnosis and attributed this latest development to complications of that condition. Last year, she told People other side effects she struggled with included depression, anxiety and panic attacks.

Her story must resonate to many as these facts alone provide some insight into the chronic and complex nature of this disease. I will shortly address the complicated clinical course of patients with more severe disease along with the wide spectrum of severity individuals experience.

But, first, in Selena Gomez’s own...