News and Views

Philanthropic giving constitutes roughly 2% of the U.S. economy. In 2014, it totaled $358 billion. Who gives all that money, and where does it go?

Small donations from average people make up a considerable proportion of total donations. But then there are the large donors, individuals and groups who can donate $1 million or more. Scientists, colleges and universities, artists, nonprofits, and many others are obviously interested in knowing more about these types of donors.

A database, called the Million Dollar List, has compiled information on gifts of $1 million and more since 2000. A team of researchers from Indiana University mined it for patterns in giving, and their findings were...

Hot water must be used in order to wash your hands effectively. 

Right? 

That's a given, your mom told you so from the age of 3 and everyone knows it, correct?

Everyone may know it, but now we're learning that it's not necessarily true, according to health researchers from Rutgers University seeking to determine the proper water temperature(s) that are effective in killing germs and harmful bacteria. And according to results of a study announced this week, the temperature of the water doesn't matter. What does matter is using soap, and washing thoroughly for 10 seconds.

Now, you may be thinking: "So what? Hot. Cold. What's the big deal?"

No big deal, just several...

With the Jupiter Police dash-cam video of Tiger Woods’ DUI arrest just released, the public gets a further glimpse into the unfortunate event.

The depiction accompanies a report revealed earlier this week where Woods apologizes and attributes what happened to “an unexpected reaction to prescribed medications.” He denied alcohol use and this was affirmed by police testing.

Due to being found asleep at the wheel on the side of the road, having slurred and slowed speech as well as a failed field sobriety test, police arrested him on suspicion of driving under the influence. Tiger Woods took ownership of the...

Announcing an unprecedented voyage, NASA said today that it will send a spacecraft to the Sun, where it will explore its fiery outer reaches and "make critical observations that will answer decades-old questions about the physics of how stars work."

In making the announcement at the University of Chicago, which was streamed live on its website, the space agency said that the unmanned craft representing the United States would embark on "humanity’s first mission to a star."

A primary reason for the mission, scheduled to take place beginning in July or August 2018, is to learn more about "solar wind" that was identified in the late 1950's by...

1. Physics: Man hits 88 MPH in a DeLorean, gets a speeding ticket rather than a trip to 1955

Spencer White bought a 1982 DeLorean so he did what everyone wants to do ever since the 1985 movie “Back to The Future” - he cranked it up to 88 MPH. In the movie, bananas science related to that speed and a flux capacitor (which to me looked just like the Oscillation Overthruster from Buckaroo Banzai: Across The 8th Dimension) caused a trip 30 years back in time. 

It was less exciting, and more expensive, in 2017. A California Highway Patrol officer pulled him over and asked if he knew how fast he was going. White knew exactly how fast he was going, and...

Pfizer was recently in the news over ‘their’ shortage of Bicillin and the NY Times reports that Pfizer is also responsible for the lack of another crucial medication, sodium bicarbonate – the ubiquitous kitchen product that most of us use either to bake or to keep our refrigerators smelling fresh. Shortages of pharmaceuticals is a persistent problem. As a physician, I have been asked to postponed elective care while drugs in short supply were prioritized to more critical patients and I have had that experience working in academic medical centers and small rural...

My colleague has written about the latest offering from the American Institute for Cancer Research(AICR), New Report: Just One Alcoholic Drink a Day Increases Breast Cancer Risk. I will leave it in her capable hands to discuss the problem with that headline, but I did want to note in passing some information deep within the report itself. Well, a report may be the wrong word, it is a meta-analysis by their experts on meta-analysis papers...

"Follow the money!" activists shout. The money trail, according to this logic, always leads to lies and deception.

This puerile fallacy, argumentum ad aurum, is just a thinly disguised ad hominem attack commonly used against scientists. Instead of criticizing the quality or conclusions of the research, activists instead assault the integrity of the scientist.

For certain, money can be a corrupting influence. That's why journals require scientists to disclose financial ties to industry. But money isn't the only source of corruption. Indeed, anything that causes a person to reject evidence-based science should be considered a...

Soliris is a pharmaceutical used to treat an orphan disease, atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS). An orphan disease by definition effects 200,000 people or less in the United States. aHUS is a genetic disease, where blood elements (cells and platelets) are destroyed by the immune system, and their debris interferes with kidney function resulting in high blood pressure and ultimately renal failure. Before 2011 treatment consisted of transfusions to replace the blood elements lost, use of blood pressure medications to control hypertension and as necessary plasmapheresis. Plasmapheresis clears the blood of the debris that injures the kidney. Plasmapheresis, like dialysis, involves being ‘hooked...

As part of the newly published proposed budget are significant cuts to research and the prime target are indirect expenses, what seems to be a slush fund to some and a critical financial asset to others.

“I was struck by one thing at NIH,” Price said, “and that is that about 30 percent of the grant money that goes out is used for indirect expenses, which as you know means that that money goes for something other than the research that’s being done.” [1]

Widely cited in this discussion are figures noting indirect cost payments of 27.9% ($6.6 billion out of $23.5 billion) or Johns Hopkins receiving $156 million in indirect costs associated with $1....