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From all of the hysteria that has been generated in recent years — mostly by environmental groups — about trace amounts of the plastic component bisphenol-A (BPA) found in human urine, you might think it was sarin gas rather than a harmless chemical (1) that's been used to line food cans without issue since the 1960s.

Liners are used to seal the can and keep out air. In the absence of liners, food poisoning is more common, so clearly a lot of people have been saved by this technology.

But, if not for chemical scares how would the groups, who raise money based on nonsense, survive? It wouldn't be easy, and so BPA became just one compound in a...

A February 23rd, 2018 statement from the U.S Food and Drug Administration about bisphenol A (BPA) should come as no surprise to anyone who has read our work. It affirmed that the American Council on Science and Health and other pro-science groups have been right all along and it is completely safe - something that incompetent or dishonest environmental groups like the Environmental Working Group or the Natural Resources Defense Council, or Internet hucksters like Joe Mercola and Mike Adams, cannot be happy to hear.

After a thorough two-year study, the agency has released a draft report of the NTP (National Toxicology Program) Research Report on the CLARITY-BPA ...

In the current issue of The American, science writer Jon Entine takes a look at the comprehensive list of scientific institutions world-wide that have found no cause for concern about bisphenol A (BPA), and asks why politicians are nevertheless imposing bans on the substance. Anti-BPA campaigners have created a straw man in the way they portray the research landscape, Entine observes. And, he notes, Political systems often operate with limited information and short time horizons, while much of science is complex and evolving.

Entine, however, takes the time to explain the misconceptions about BPA, as well as to...

BPA is in the news yet again, and this time it is being linked to childhood asthma. According to the new study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, children who are exposed to BPA are at an increased risk for asthma. But from reading the article, we found a paucity of data to support that assertion. In fact, maybe just the opposite.

The study involved 568 women from the Mothers and Newborns study which measured BPA exposure using urine samples taken during the third trimester of pregnancy, and in kids ages 3, 5 and 7 years. Asthma was diagnosed by doctors between the ages of 5 and 12 based on symptoms, medical history and a pulmonary function test. After adjusting for various risk...

New York NY -- January 15th, 2010. The American Council on Science and Health applauds today's decision by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) not to ban the plastic hardener bisphenol-A (BPA). Despite heavy pressure from various activist "environmental" groups, the FDA has not placed any restrictions on the chemical's use in consumer products but rather decided to "support" industry's decisions to reduce exposure to BPA in food-related products aimed at infants and children. FDA is also "facilitating" the development of alternatives to BPA in infant formula cans.

FDA stopped well short of a ban on this common and useful chemical, which has been in safe use in a wide spectrum of consumer products for over 50 years. ACSH scientists are pleased but remain...

ACSH’s Dr. Elizabeth Whelan this morning joined a Hartford, Conn. talk radio program to discuss the claims that the chemical BPA in can linings and plastic products is hazardous to health.

She recounts, “When they asked why there is such a growing panic about BPA’s safety, I responded that anti-chemical activists are manipulating consumers’ unfamiliarity with chemicals by making false claims, including claims that BPA causes cancer and ‘hormonal changes.’ I also pointed out that anti-BPA activists have the media stage to themselves as, with very few exceptions, scientists have chosen to remain mute on the subject and have allowed misinformation and hype to prevail.”

But the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA) didn’t remain mute after Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s press...

This article first appeared on Forbes.com.

The "toxin du jour" these days is bisphenol A, otherwise known as BPA. Environmental activists claim BPA harms babies as it dissolves out of the sides of baby bottles and sippy cups, causing everything from cancer to learning disabilities and even obesity. Spurred by consumer groups, Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal wants Coca-Cola, Del Monte and other companies investigated for trying to stop anti-BPA legislation.

In fact, BPA has been used safely for about 60 years to make plastic bottles hard and shatter-proof, for the coatings of metal food containers and even in cellphones and medical...

BPA has long been blamed by environmental activists for supposedly mimicking the hormone estrogen (although scientists say its estrogenic effects are akin to eating tofu). Now researchers are trying to argue the chemical raises testosterone. A study of 715 Italian men and women aged 20 to 74 published in Environmental Health Perspectives found that men with the highest levels of BPA in their urine also had an increase in their blood testosterone concentrations although all the hormone levels still remained within normal range.

WebMd Health News quoted ACSH s Dr. Elizabeth Whelan on the the study results:

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bpaA recent study examining the association between prenatal BPA (bisphenol-A) exposure and lung function has been making headlines, often with titles similar to BPA linked to asthma. However, the actual study is about as bad as they come. You can just as easily conclude anything about BPA exposure and lung function as you can who will win the All Star Game in 2019.

The study, published in JAMA Pediatrics, examined whether pre- and post-natal BPA exposure was associated with lung function in children at 4 and 5 years old. BPA exposure was measured...

Last year, ACSH released a report highlighting breast cancer organizations that relied on flawed science and chemophobia to support the alleged link between environmental chemicals and breast cancer. The Breast Cancer Fund was in the forefront of those among the most toxic organizations, so it should come as no surprise that the group s latest report attacks the widely used plastic hardener bisphenol A (BPA).

Breast Cancer Fund researchers (and we use that term loosely) tested for the presence of BPA in six children s canned food products, including Campbell s Disney Princess...