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If any of you are still alive out there here's another scare for you to not worry about.  Only, it's the same tired scare that you've seen hundreds of times - chemicals in food containers, and it's just as wrong now as it was 25 years ago. Which makes it is a bit puzzling why Julia Belluz, writing for Vox, would choose this topic, even if what was in it was correct. Belluz usually gets it right. Not this time; she spoke with the wrong people.

As The Four Topps sang in 1965, the article, entitled "The problem with all the plastic that’s leaching into your food - There’s mounting evidence that it’s a health hazard," is...

Sometimes the latest junk-science news makes us want to bang our heads against the wall. New York's Suffolk County has just passed the "Safer Sales Slip Act," banning the use of bisphenol A (BPA) in thermal cash register slips.

Fox 5 News in New York did interview ACSH's Dr. Gilbert Ross about the ban for a few moments, we guess to "balance" Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone's claims that BPA is an "endocrine disruptor" that is linked to everything from breast cancer to infertility to heart disease (Although balance may be an inaccurate description, since Dr. Ross was quoted for about 20 seconds, compared to the minute-plus given to Bellone).

Hey, Fox 5 it's not that "...

Screen Shot 2014-04-09 at 1.05.06 PMAt ACSH we shout a lot. Sometimes even at each other. But most of the time it takes the form of shoutouts to like-minded writers and websites (and there aren t that many) that believe that real science, not agenda-driven nonsense, should actually be used to guide public health policy.

Today s shoutout #1 goes to the prolific (and brilliant) Trevor Butterworth an outspoken (and then some) critic of junk science, especially intentional junk science.

Butterworth s new...

Raising the specter of “endocrine disruption” is always a good way to promote anxiety and concern, as the National Workgroup for Safe Markets must know very well.

Its report declaring it had found trace levels of the chemical Bisphenol A (BPA) in cans of food prompted scary news stories. “Before you open a can of soup or green beans,” one report ominously intoned, “you might want to hear this.”

But conclusions...

We d like to give a shout-out to Julia Seymour of the Business & Media Institute of the Virginia-based Media Research Center. Seymour recently conducted a content analysis of mainstream media (The New York Times, The Washington Post, ABC, CBS, and NBC news reports, among many others), identifying the scare tactics they've used to exacerbate the phobia so many people have of food-packaging chemicals specifically in her analysis, bisphenol A (BPA).

Seymour found that an outstanding majority (99 percent, over the two years she studied, 2010-2011) of media stories focused on the threat of BPA. Conversely, only two of the 87 stories discussed the research...

The Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association (AMA) has resulted in the Association s adoption of a bevy of new public safety policies that have little (or nothing) to do with the actual safety of the public. Among the Association s new policies are its official stance against bisphenol A (BPA) and their support of the Environmental Protection Agency s (EPA) national mercury emissions standards for cement plants. ACHS's Dr. Elizabeth Whelan observes that the AMA has a very poor record of being on target, even when it sticks to health and medical issues. ACSH s Jody Manley, upon reading the news, wonders why the AMA hasn t chosen to address such real...

Angela Logomasini of the Competitive Enterprise Institute defends BPA in the Washington Examiner in light of this week’s possible Senate vote on an amendment to the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act that would ban the chemical in food packaging.

“As she writes in her op-ed, BPA has many important applications for consumer products,” says Dr. Ross. “All valid scientific evidence and all government regulatory bodies that have evaluated this evidence have come to the same conclusion: BPA is safe. Any argument to the contrary is a politically motivated attack on a safe consumer product...

As we have often noted, independent and government-sponsored studies worldwide have repeatedly found that normal exposure to the plastic hardener bisphenol-A (BPA) poses no risk to human health. Further supporting this is a new clinical study out of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine that found no correlation between BPA levels in urine and type 2 diabetes. The study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine this month, involved over 3,400 residents of Shanghai.

ACSH s Dr. Gilbert Ross was pleased to hear that the findings of this clinical study support what other research has...

The precautionary principle has given birth to fears that infants delivered via Cesarean section or with the aid of forceps are at risk of phthalate and bisphenol A (BPA) contamination. At least those are the findings of a something like a study published Tuesday in France s Health Watch Institute publication, Weekly Epidemiological Bulletin (Bulletin Epidemiologic Hebdomadaire). The study authors screened about 280 urine samples and observed 500 births, then concluded that the bisphenol A (BPA) from urine bags and the phthalates from medical equipment are present in higher concentrations in women who do not give birth...

This piece first appeared in the New York Post.

Chemical-phobia is in full bloom this spring. Terrifying headlines on cancer risks, infertility, impaired sexual development and more have plastic bottles and rubber duckies being pulled off store shelves.

But the risks aren't real - the scary "news" is an artifact of a research method that falsely reports dangers in chemicals that don't harm our health. Applied across the board, it would lead to bans on about half the chemicals in the world -- including the...