Search

Screen Shot 2014-06-03 at 2.04.30 PMIs there anything these days that doesn t get politicized? It would seem not, since the chemical BPA is the latest culprit

An op-ed by Merrill Matthews in Investors.com, the online blog of Investors Business Daily would seem to say no. The piece entitled Left Wants EPA To Ban Chemical FDA Says Isn't Harmful describes how a common and harmless chemical bisphenol A, aka BPA has turned into a political rallying...

bpaResearchers from South Korea s Seoul University College of Medicine and its Department of Environmental Health did a double-blind, crossover study of 60 older people to detect an effect of bisphenol-A (BPA) on blood pressure. Their results gave them a basis for asserting a causal relationship between drinking soy milk from a can lined with a BPA-containing polymer, and a 4.5 mm rise in systolic blood pressure (SBP).

The changes in SBP were compared with controls the same subjects who were given soy milk from glass bottles. The several-week-long study was conducted among seniors (over-60) at a community center, and the...

ACSH staffers would like to take our hats off to Coca-Cola CEO Muhtar Kent, who announced in an annual company meeting Wednesday in Atlanta that he does not believe there exists sufficient scientific evidence to stop using BPA in the epoxy linings of the company’s iconic cans.

“If we had any sliver of doubt about the safety of our packaging, we would not continue to use [BPA]. It’s that simple,” Mr. Kent stated, despite the fact that 26 percent of Coca-Cola’s shareholders, including the two largest proxy advisors in the U.S., asked the soda giant to reveal its plans over the continued use of BPA in its packaging.

ACSH would also like to applaud Alan...

466583_32876683Earlier this week, we discussed a study conducted by Frederick vom Saal, the best-known fringe anti-BPA activist posing as a scientist, attempting to link high levels of BPA in the blood stream and urine from the handling of thermal paper cash receipts to increased risk of serious diseases. Yet, as ACSH advisor Dr. Geoffrey Kabat points...

In his syndicated column, Fox Business News’ John Stossel debunks the myths surrounding the recent claims of adverse health effects associated with bisphenol-A (BPA), a plastic ingredient widely and safely used in many products for over 50 years. Stossel stated that in many cases, the media is responsible for much of this fear-mongering in order to get better ratings. He references “Tapped,” a recent documentary that quotes so-called experts alleging “BPA may be one of the most potent toxic chemicals known to man.”

ACSH staffers have known for a long time that there’s no validity to that statement and that BPA actually saves lives. See our wise words as quoted by Stossel...

Last week, the Canadian government reaffirmed the safe use of bisphenol A (BPA) in food packaging, upholding its 2008 stance that dietary exposure to the chemical does not pose a health risk to the general population, including newborns and young children.

Although this report is reassuring, Canada is responsible for much of the anti-chemical hysteria surrounding plastics and chemicals today. Despite finding that BPA posed no health risk in 2008, two years later Health Canada s Bureau of Chemical Safety declared BPA to be toxic and banned it from baby bottles, claiming that when heated, the chemical may leach out of plastics at levels...

Here’s a story that you probably didn’t read in your morning newspaper: An international panel of experts meeting in Canada has rebuked the numerous bodies in recent years that have restricted the common plastic hardening chemical bisphenol A (BPA). The panel has concluded that the levels of BPA circulating in the human body “are very low, indicating that BPA is not accumulated in the body and is rapidly eliminated through urine.”

The panel went on to say:

A few recent experimental and epidemiological studies found associations between low BPA exposure levels and some adverse health outcomes. The meeting concluded that, at this stage, it is difficult to interpret...

An unintentionally amusing report entitled "On the Money: BPA on Dollar Bills and Receipts”, which was released yesterday by a radical advocacy consortium comprised of The Washington Toxics Coalition and Safer Chemicals Healthy Families, claims that 21 out of 22 dollar bills they tested contained trace levels of bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical sometimes alleged to be a causative agent for a slew of mysterious health maladies. In addition to money, the organization also analyzed thermal paper receipts and found that 50 percent of those receipts, gathered from retailers in 10 different states and Washington, D.C., also contained BPA. The group went on to claim, rather...

The FDA decided to stand up for science by rejecting alarmist hype that BPA (bisphenol A) is a dangerous threat to our health. Putting an end to years of speculation regarding the future of this chemical, the FDA rejected a petition by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) to ban the use of BPA in food packaging. BPA is a widely-used component of many consumer products, and it also protects canned foods from contamination and spoilage; it has been safely used for decades.

Anticipating the FDA decision, activist hype alleging all sorts of health effects from trace levels of BPA has...

A December 20, 2006 article by Kara Sissell from Chemical Week notes ACSH's report on BPA:

Alleged links between exposure to low doses of bisphenol A (BPA) and some diseases cannot be supported by the available data, says a report released last week by the American Council on Science and Health (ACSH; New York), which receives some funding from industry. A review of existing data concludes that animal studies showing a link between BPA and disease "cannot be validly extrapolated to the human situation," ACSH says.

"The available data do not establish that...exposure to these substances at low doses produces adverse health effects," ACSH says. "There is no compelling evidence that...