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148056098The BPA-cancer link is making headlines again. This time, researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago claim that according to their study, exposure to low levels of BPA in utero is associated with an increased risk of developing prostate cancer.

Researchers, led by Dr. Gail Prins, professor of physiology and director of the andrology laboratory at the UIC College of Medicine, implanted human prostate stem cells into 143 mice. One group of mice was fed BPA for two weeks following...

A December 20, 2006 article by Kara Sissell from Chemical Week notes ACSH's report on BPA:

Alleged links between exposure to low doses of bisphenol A (BPA) and some diseases cannot be supported by the available data, says a report released last week by the American Council on Science and Health (ACSH; New York), which receives some funding from industry. A review of existing data concludes that animal studies showing a link between BPA and disease "cannot be validly extrapolated to the human situation," ACSH says.

"The available data do not establish that...exposure to these substances at low doses produces adverse health effects," ACSH says. "There is no compelling evidence that...

Screen Shot 2015-06-16 at 2.44.19 PMIf there is a better example of what happens when junk science meets reality, good luck finding it. Look no further than today s New York Times article about how a misguided attempt to solve a non-problem turned into a real problem.

ACSH s Dr. Josh Bloom says, Let s give (negative) credit to the anti-BPA cottage industry. They have succeeded beyond their wildest dreams in scaring the public about a big fat...

Well, BPA is finally making us sick too... no, not the plastic chemical, but all the junk science floating around about it, especially in breathless (but false) media headlines. But a new study is getting a lot of press attention, so there’s no way we can avoid giving it a mention. A study of 218 Chinese factory workers found those with detectable BPA levels in their urine were more likely to have “poor semen quality.”

But “these workers seemed...

Despite spending more than a decade of research and millions of dollars, some researchers are not yet satisfied that bisphenol A (BPA) — used to make many plastic products hard and resilient — is safe. In today’s New York Times, Denise Grady examines the inconsistent research findings regarding BPA’s safety. She also reports on the numerous state bans of BPA and the efforts of Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) to ban its use in baby bottles nationwide through an amendment to an impending food safety bill scheduled for a Senate...

Beginning in March 2011, the European Union will outlaw the use of bisphenol A (BPA) in the manufacture of plastic baby bottles, and their import and sales will be proscribed in June 2011.

Labeled an “estrogen-like chemical” and “endocrine disruptor,” BPA was banned from baby products in Canada earlier this year.

The news is both perplexing and disappointing to ACSH's Dr. Elizabeth Whelan. “Am I crazy? Do I know something the European Commission doesn’t, or is it the other way around? There has been a worldwide panic over BPA for absolutely no reason — there is no evidence to indict BPA, as the science clearly demonstrates.”

ACSH's Dr. Gilbert Ross was equally...

Last week, a day-long meeting was held at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina to discuss the results of a $30-million federal study designed to assess the safety of bisphenol A, or BPA. The study, CLARITY-BPA, represents a collaboration between two camps that have long been at odds over the safety of BPA: scientists and regulatory experts at the FDA, on the one hand, and academic scientists, who are funded by the NIEHS, on the other.

BPA has been used for over 50 years in the epoxy resin linings of food...

In a move that runs contrary to the weight of scientific evidence and yields to the whims of a small number of media-savvy activists, Campbell Soup Company has announced that they will be phasing out the use of BPA (bisphenol-A) in the lining of their cans.

BPA is a commonly used chemical that is present in a wide variety of food packaging and other products. As ACSH's Dr. Elizabeth Whelan notes, BPA protects food quality: When used in can linings, it prevents metals from leaching into can contents, and reduces the risk of bacterial contamination, including botulism. The...

After the politically-motivated listing of the plastic hardener Bisphenol-A (BPA) was at last squeezed onto California s nefarious Proposition 65 list of allegedly toxic chemicals, a local Sacramento judge kicked it off, correctly stating that the chemical s listing flew in the face of scientific and regulatory evidence. A division of California s environmental agency finally figured out a way to list BPA, a poster-child for toxic chemicals and endocrine disrupters of the radical environmental activists. This was accomplished by using a bureaucratic subterfuge to get around the scientific committee which had repeatedly rejected listing it. But, not so fast, said Sacramento County Superior Court Judge Raymond Cadei, who (unlike the Prop 65 committee members, apparently) actually...

bpaYesterday in Dispatch we wrote about a study asserting a causal relationship between drinking soy milk from a can lined with a BPA-containing polymer, and a 4.5 mm rise in systolic blood pressure (SBP). Of course, we pointed out the fact that study was rife with confounding and confusing fudge factors. Furthermore, no one commenting on this study in the public arena seems to recall that every scientific body in the world, including our FDA and even the EPA, has deemed BPA safe in consumer products,...