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bpaYesterday in Dispatch we wrote about a study asserting a causal relationship between drinking soy milk from a can lined with a BPA-containing polymer, and a 4.5 mm rise in systolic blood pressure (SBP). Of course, we pointed out the fact that study was rife with confounding and confusing fudge factors. Furthermore, no one commenting on this study in the public arena seems to recall that every scientific body in the world, including our FDA and even the EPA, has deemed BPA safe in consumer products,...

Not even three weeks after the FDA denied a petition to ban the plastic hardener BPA (bisphenol A) from food packaging, declaring that the daily levels of human exposure pose no health risk, backlash has appeared in The Washington Post. Susan Freinkel, author of Plastic: A Toxic Love Story, has written a lengthy article decrying BPA and phthalates, a class of chemicals used to increase the flexibility and durability of plastics.

In her alarmist, multi-columned declamation against these and...

967632_38993259Earlier this month, Democratic Senator Ed Markey of Massachusetts introduced a bill that would ban BPA from food and beverage containers cleverly titled the Ban Poisonous Additives Act of 2014. Angela Logomasini, a Senior Fellow at the Independent Women s Forum and the Competitive Enterprise Institute, co-founder of the Culture of Alarmism and co-editor of Safe Chemical Policy News wrote an...

Here is yet another example of the media vastly mischaracterizing the results of a scientific study: While the data show no relationship between levels of BPA (bisphenol-A) and heart disease, a new report is actually being spun in the news under headlines that suggest the opposite, such as BPA chemical may be tied to heart disease.

Researchers in the UK, in a study published in the journal Circulation, measured levels of BPA in participants who did not have heart disease, using a single urine sample for each participant. They then tracked these participants for 10...

Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand of New York plan to introduce the "BPA-Free Kids Act," which would ban the chemical from containers for young children's products. Activist pressure to restrict the use of BPA is heating up as the FDA prepares to release their latest opinion on it. The Breast Cancer Fund, for example, has called for the FDA to issue an immediate ban on BPA in hard plastic food containers and require labeling of all other food packaging containing BPA.

"You would think that the Breast Cancer Fund would focus on things that would help reduce or prevent breast cancer," says ACSH's Dr. Elizabeth Whelan. "The fact that they're using their name to advocate this is shameful."

"The assertion that BPA plays any role in the incidence or severity of...

969794_66501285If you thought you d seen all the putative risks to health from the chemical bisphenol-A (BPA), think again. It s been one of the most frequently cited supposedly dangerous chemicals in fear-mongers armamentaria. Their drumbeat of alarmism persists, although study after study has failed to find a valid link between BPA and dangers to human health. In fact, the FDA (among numerous scientific and regulatory bodies worldwide) has studied it and determined that its use in food cans and other containers is...

This piece first appeared on TCSDaily.com.

Activists and some politicians are exploiting parents' legitimate concerns for their children's health by trying to convince state governments to pass a ban on the safe and eminently useful chemical bisphenol-A (BPA).

BPA has been used in many familiar guises for decades, with absolutely no reliable evidence of harm to humans of any age. Considering its many uses, one might say it's almost ubiquitous. Among the most common uses: plastic bottles of many types--it's required in the manufacture of shatter-proof polycarbonate plastic, which is also invaluable in baby bottles, bike helmets and protective car-seats, eyeglass lenses, and medical devices...

Activists at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) are patting themselves on the back now that the FDA has agreed to respond to their petition demanding a ruling on bisphenol A s (BPA) health risks or lack thereof. According to a federal court settlement, the FDA will have to decide by March 31 whether to ban, restrict, or otherwise regulate BPA, which is present in everything from hard, clear plastic products to the linings of metal food containers, and has been in widespread use for over 40 years.

Although the FDA along with every scientific authority to have evaluated the chemical has held that the low levels of BPA we re exposed...

And while we re on the topic of BPA, we d like to applaud ACSH colleague Jon Entine s recent exposé of the disconnect between public relations and scientific evidence that has resulted from uninformed public outcry over the chemical.

How did the world s largest soup company go from pariah to paragon over its use of the controversial chemical bisphenol A? Entine asks in his investigative piece for Forbes. It lied, he explains. He then goes on to tell an ugly...

138829_6871A couple of weeks ago, we pointed out that a report that BPA increases the risk of miscarriage in high-risk women was baseless. Now a cogent article in Forbes magazine carries the message even further.

Dr. Angela Logomasini points out several...