Search

In a blog entry published on Friday, Anrew Van Dam with the Association of Health Care Journalists finally noticed the media bias against bisphenol-A (BPA) that ACSH staffers almost alone against the crowd have been condemning for some time. In a review of American media coverage of the controversy of bisphenol-A, researchers at STATS (a nonprofit, nonpartisan Statistical Assessment Service affiliated with George Mason University), say the media failed to properly weight different studies based on their size and research methodology.

ACSH's Dr. Elizabeth Whelan has noticed the trend: If you looked at media coverage of BPA for the last six months, you d find that a vast majority of the reports were biased in favor of anti-chemical scares. There were very few scientists who...

This weekend was full of surprising news stories. The strangest came from a Sydney Morning Herald article claiming that ingestion of environmental chemicals such as bisphenol A (BPA) may have caused the increase in women’s breast size observed over the past 50 years. While the article addresses other health concerns such as obesity, it places a strong emphasis on chemical exposures.

“The estrogenic potency of BPA is several orders of magnitude lower than estrogens women have endogenously from their ovaries, and to a less extent, the adrenal glands,” ACSH's Dr. Gilbert Ross asserts. “BPA cannot possibly contribute to such gross physiological changes in human beings. Even phytoestrogens found...

Could those California bears have been watching our own BPA bears? The Golden State’s proposed ban on bisphenol A in children’s products is now on “life support” after falling three votes short of winning final passage in the state Senate Wednesday, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. The bill had already passed the Senate once, but needed to come back for concurrence on amendments and this time came up shy. Backers may try again, however.

...

Following what it calls a “detailed and comprehensive review of recent scientific literature and studies,” the European Food Safety Authority has again found no reason to revise safety standards for low-dose exposure to bisphenol A (BPA). This was the agency’s third review on the subject, carried out at the request of the European Commission; it also carried out reviews in 2006 and 2008.

The panel’s members acknowledged that “some recent studies report adverse effects on animals exposed to BPA during development” at exposures below the current safety...

bpaACSH friend and author Jack Dini published a very informative article countering many fears regarding common substances found in plastics. The article, titled Don t fall victim to plastic leaching from items, was recently published in the Canada Free Press.

The column summarizes some of the recent literature surrounding these substances, including BPA (Bisphenol A) and phthalates. Jack Dini references scientific findings on the safety of these substances, including a study on BPA in lab rats that found no health effects in the rats, even at doses up to more than 70,000 times the usual human exposure.

Don t fall victim...

ACSH staffers would like to offer a seat at the table to Ken Green of the American Enterprise Institute for his article on the BPA scare.

He notes: "The safety of BPA has been affirmed by research undertaken by the U.S. National Toxicology Program, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; the U.S. Centers for Disease Control; the European Food Safety Authority; Japan's National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology; Germany's Federal Environmental Agency; the European Commission's Scientific Committee on Toxicity, Ecotoxicity, and the Environment; the European Commission's Scientific Committee on Food; and the European Food Safety Authority."

"That's an important point," says ACSH's Dr. Elizabeth Whelan. "It leaves us with the same question we've been...

While on the road again in Washington, D.C., ACSH's Jeff Stier attended the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research conference on BPA. One of the presenters, Dr. Julie Goodman, director of epidemiology at Gradient Corp. and an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, provided the most insight concerning the real adverse effects of BPA in humans, which are none.

According to Dr. Goodman s presentation, a study-by-study analysis of BPA effects in laboratory animals yields completely inconsistent numbers and invalid conclusions. ACSH's Dr. Gilbert Ross adds, These studies by different labs are not reproducible from lab to lab because the thesis is faulty it s...

Two bills proposing a ban on the use of bisphenol A (BPA) in food packaging were introduced in France last year by the French Socialist party at the National Assembly. Slated to be approved by the end of this month, following an examination by the French senate, the bills would require that manufacturers operating in France alter their packaging at a high cost.

The pending legislation has American companies worried, given that the ban would also affect exports of food products to France, such as beer and juice. And since the French are the second largest purchasers of Florida juices, the BPA proscription would have an adverse impact on the sale of plastic containers of such products....

Despite Canada s decision last week to restrict the use of bisphenol-A (BPA) due to its supposed adverse health effects, Australia is sticking to its guns by declaring that the country will continue to enforce the European Union s safe level (600 parts per billion) of BPA exposure.

Dr. Paul Brent, the chief scientist of Food Standards Australia New Zealand, isn t caving into the pressure of consumer groups to re-review the standards of BPA. [Industry] are convinced as we are that BPA is safe [but because of consumer concern] there is a lot of action going on. The scientific concern has been played up, Dr. Brent said, according to the Brisbane Times....

Teresa Heinz clearly hasn’t read Lawrence Meyer’s anti-alarmist blog post against baseless chemical scares — her foundation has deemed the dubious BPA research of University of Missouri biological sciences professor Frederick vom Saal worthy of the $100,000 Heinz Award. The award was given just one day after he published a...