Search

Australian Federal Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg met recently with his state and territory counterparts. Top of their agenda? The recycling crisis precipitated by the China “ban.”

States and councils around the country have been struggling since the imposition of import restrictions that exclude 99% of the recyclables that Australia previously sold to China.

Hopes are high that the federal government will step in and take a clear role. Proposed solutions include investing in onshore processing facilities and local markets, incentives or mandates to use recycled content, and grants and rebates for innovative approaches that go beyond recycling to designing for prevention and reuse.

But what is the ban and why is it such an issue?

What is the...

Last month, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), which operates under the auspices of the U.N. World Health Organization, announced it would solicit comments from interested parties prior to holding an Advisory Group meeting in November to propose revisions to its Preamble.

The preamble articulates the mission and methods of the IARC Monographs program and an update has been long overdue. The Monographs program has been embroiled in controversy brought on by questions regarding its assessments of cell phones, acrylamide, formaldehyde, red and processed meat, coffee, and the herbicide glyphosate. That last one may have been the last straw. The World Health Organization, of which IARC is a part, disavowed their methodology, as...

I've never been much for the word "tribe." It sounds too insular in 2018, the kind of term (see also "zeitgeist", "heteronormative", and "schadenfreude") thrown around by barely literate postmodernists with their heads in the clouds believing what they tell each other as the real world passes by.

That's not to say it isn't an accurate description of science media.

We certainly have tribes: There are progressive ideologues in large media corporations denying reality as they frame science belief (and denial) through their politics; there are academics who believe the public simply have a deficit of information and showing them some Powerpoint slides will fix it; we have zealots who believe every skeptical question must be met with fire and brimstone. 

Heck, we have...

In addition to being a source of universal frustration, the high cost of drugs is a public relations nightmare for health systems and the much maligned pharmaceutical industry. Sold as an endeavor to save the day, the former are aligning in a multi-system collaborative effort led by Intermountain Health to fight consolidation with consolidation in a strategic play to enter the generic drug market. Together, with the likes of the Mayo Clinic, Ascension and HCA Healthcare, thereby controlling 500 U.S. hospitals, their launch (previously...

Do you think video games have led to more violent attacks by young people? You are not alone. Lots of people do. It was in every major newspaper because a meta-analysis once showed it was so.  But then another meta-analysis showed that belief is false.

Journalists gushed over both claims(1) even though one was suspect to anyone who understands the nature of selection bias in meta-analyses. So let's discuss what a meta-analysis is and what it can and cannot do. 

What meta-analysis is: It is just what it sounds like, an analysis of analyses, which is better than a literary criticism of literary criticisms, though in...

I lack the art gene. While other people can spend hours in a single room at the Met or MOMA, after five minutes I'm thinking about ways to light myself on fire. I just don't get art. 

But I do get chemistry, and as we speak, there is an Andy Warhol exhibit at the Whitney Museum of American Art, which is a seriously hot ticket (I'd rather jam fishhooks in my eye). And these two converged when I read about some of the techniques that Warhol used, like peeing on paintings. And inviting others to do the same. This is not as crazy as it sounds ...

Dr. Whelan presented this speech on November 10, 1992 upon her acceptance of the Calver Award presenter by the Environmental Division of the American Public Health Association.

This lecture pays tribute to Homer Calver and his crusade against premature death and disease during the first decades of this century. Calver's greatness came because of the time in which he lived.

The modern cinema often portrays the early twentieth century as the gilded age of romance and comfortable leisure. But, it also was a world with the persistent stench of raw sewage and suffocating air pollution; a world haunted by misery and early death from tuberculosis, diphtheria, influenza and diarrheal diseases; a time when medical procedure and practices were medieval Calver was more than...

The onset of menopause presents a complex set of questions to many women. One of those questions may be whether or not to begin hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

Hormone replacement therapy (also known as estrogen replacement therapy, or ERT) involves taking a daily dose of estrogen, either alone or, more commonly, as part of an estrogen/progesterone combination. The purpose of HRT is to restore the body's hormone levels to a premenopausal state. HRT has long been promoted for its effectiveness in alleviating such symptoms of menopause as "hot flashes" and for the protective effect it has on the bones and the heart. The potential benefits of estrogen have inspired some champions of HRT to call it "youth in a pill." Yet enthusiasm for HRT is often dimmed, if not doused outright...

The Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act amends the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and was signed into law June 22, 2016. It created a mandatory requirement for EPA to evaluate existing chemicals with clear and enforceable deadlines, to do so in a transparent fashion, and to do so using risk-based chemical assessments rather than rely on simple epidemiological correlations. 

EPA selected the first 10 chemicals to undergo risk evaluation under the amended TSCA and to make those understandable for the public, the American Council on Science and Health is producing risk-based evaluations of each, which will then be compiled into a free downloadable book...

The Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act amends the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and was signed into law June 22, 2016. It created a mandatory requirement for EPA to evaluate existing chemicals with clear and enforceable deadlines, to do so in a transparent fashion, and to do so using risk-based chemical assessments rather than rely on simple epidemiological correlations. 

EPA selected the first 10 chemicals to undergo risk evaluation under the amended TSCA and to make those understandable for the public, the American Council on Science and Health is producing risk-based evaluations of each, which will then be compiled into a free downloadable book...