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If not for the pies, I wouldn't be caught dead in a Whole Foods. Yet this past weekend, the need for pie overwhelmed the necessity of a conscience, so I found myself inside the wretched place. OK, this is only partly true (1)

Perhaps, in a feeble attempt to offset the lack of even a modicum of conscience, I deluded myself into thinking that by making a (very) small contribution to the world of science outreach, it would somehow offset the appalling lack of integrity that I exhibited, and continues to plague me long after the pie (blueberry) is gone. 

That was some damn fine pie. It's too bad the same cannot be said for some of the other products that people were wasting their money on there. For example...

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Diet, exercise, and eat right. This is the guiding tenet by which many health-conscious people live and one of the driving forces behind the popularity of functional foods. Despite their immense popularity, there is no universally accepted definition of functional foods. Nevertheless, functional foods can best be characterized as any food or food ingredient that may provide a health benefit beyond the traditional nutrients it contains.

Two years ago, functional food and beverage sales topped $25 billion in the United States alone. Propelled by expected growth in Eastern Europe, Western Europe and North America, the...

Whole Foods lies to you. The company's entire business model -- which is predicated upon the idea that organic, non-GMO food is somehow healthier and tastier than regular food -- is a gigantic "alternative fact." And it's a profitable one at that, since organic food commands a high premium over conventional food.

That's what makes the latest news about Whole Foods so infuriating. Food Safety News reports that the company has shut down all three of its regional kitchens because the FDA "discovered a long list of 'serious violations,'" some of which resulted in surfaces being contaminated with Listeria.

Of all the different...

180693606Impossible Foods, a bioengineered foods start-up, is aiming to achieve the impossible by creating imitation meat from plant material that looks, feels, tastes, and cooks like the real thing. The founder is Patrick Brown, MD, PhD, a Stanford University professor and biochemist with a history in genetic research. Impossible Foods has $75 million in venture capital, with investors including Bill Gates.

One of their most innovative achievements is creating a veggie burger that bleeds. This is due to heme, a compound...

10985334_930376410330404_500281878817275873_oWe have taken Vani Hari The Food Babe to task multiple times for her charade posing as a credible science-based resource on nutrition, acting in the best interests of her followers, when she really is a metaphor for anti-science hype and fear, according to columnist James S. Fell. He contemplates the question: which has more of a...

As a busy working parent, I admit that I sometimes (ok, frequently) grab a granola bar as a substitute for lunch... and breakfast.

I am not saying that it is the healthiest choice. But, in today's world of running from work to school to the gym to everything else - sometimes there is no time to sit down and prepare a well balanced meal - or any meal at all. 

This is exactly the space that Soylent, a full time meal replacement product, is trying to fill. 

What is Soylent? Just in case there was any doubt, the informative video on the soylent website states right away that "soylent is food" and "although it it not intended to replace every meal, it is able to replace any meal." 

Although the mainstay is a...

The ability to provide enough nutritious food for ourselves, rests upon three pillars, sustainable agriculture, providing nutritious meals and reducing food loss and waste. The Economist’s Food Sustainability Index provides metrics for elements of these components. France, home of the fry, croissant and Burgundy was number one; for the U.S. it was a mixed report.

One measures food loss or waste in multiple ways. As a % of our total food production – the US waste only 0.8% (France wasted 1.8%). Or you might consider food waste per capita, 278 kg/person annually for the U.S., France checks in at 106kg/person/annually. What could account for the...

To the Editor:

Greenpeace, having succeeded in terrorizing Europeans about genetically modified (GM) food ingredients, is now flexing its muscles in the United States.(Gerber Baby Food, Grilled by Greenpeace, Plans Swift Overhaul; July 30,1999) Its target is not really food manufacturers, but American parents of infants and young children.

Unfortunately, Greenpeace will likely succeed in frightening parents about ingredients they don't know about. There is no evidence that GM soybeans and corn in dry baby cereal have ever hurt anyone, and companies that have to rely on scarcer supplies will have to charge more for their products.

What Greenpeace and other such groups are really accomplishing is simply provoking unwarranted anxiety in parents. Unfortunately,...

Research presented at experimental biology conference this week in Anaheim, Calif., showed that people who ate cookies labeled as organic believed that their snack contained 40% fewer calories than the same cookies that had no label.

The study s coauthor, Cornell professor Brian Wansink, explains, An organic label gives a food a health halo. It's the same basic reason people tend to overeat any snack food that's labeled as healthy or low fat. They underestimate the calories and over-reward themselves by eating more.

Dr. Whelan recognizes this phenomenon: People think of organic food as being just generally healthier, so they eat more of it. The trans-fat ban was a similar boon to the food...