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Welcome to the conclusion of this two part series on the newest hot topics in melanoma research.  

In Tanorexia? The Latest Skinny on Melanoma, we debunked myths about who is at risk and addressed means of prevention along with rare, devastating forms.

I enlisted the help of three leading melanoma researchers from The Wistar Institute —our nation’s first independent biomedical research facility where I am a member of the leadership council.  Today, we focus on immunotherapy and the new frontier in the field of melanoma research and treatments.

Let’s continue the conversation with ...

Our recent report on the role of beef in the American diet noted some beef benefits, but that didn't please everyone. Below is a prime example of how some of beef's detractors react to such news but we will not be cowed.

Responses:

February 11, 2003

As a group of scientists and administrators charged with reporting facts, your consortium should have been more forthright vis-à-vis the facts regarding the various health risks associated with the American beef industry and its roll in the American diet.

I might point out, given the fact your review failed to mention any substantive counterpoint, that European health agencies...

The world is getting fatter, and public health experts don't know what to do about it. As we discussed in part one, a wide variety of interventions, everything from calorie labels to soda taxes, have failed to reduce obesity rates to any significant extent. Yet researchers working in this field can't bring themselves to give up on policies designed to “nudge” (or even coerce) consumers into making healthier food choices.

Here I want to examine why these interventions haven't worked and why many obesity experts seem to have such a hard time accepting this fact. Nobody knows how to rid the world of obesity, but the considerations below should at least point us in the right...

“Our lack of desire to communicate science to the public has created major problems for the science community,” the journal Nature reported in June 2016. “It is difficult to generate support from the public and the government if our audience does not understand the importance or relevance of our work.” This is a widely shared concern in the academy six years later; researchers know they have to get into the public square and build rapport with taxpayers and voters. As a team from the University of Cambridge explained recently:

'Be persuasive,' 'be engaging,' 'tell stories with your science.' Most researchers have heard...

Lockdowns, non-pharmacologic interventions, and that includes wearing masks have been a feature of our lives for well over a year. We are not alone as the Hopkins study reports of the 186 countries studied all but one imposed restrictions. Here is the current global situation based upon a “stringency index.” [2]

 

 

 

 

The researchers were spurred to do the analysis because there did not seem to be a significant correlation between the stringency of lockdowns and the reduction in fatalities.

...

Hey, chemistry fans. It's time to live the good life!. I know that a distressingly high number of you who count on the regular appearance of The Dreaded Chemistry Lesson From HellTM to fill your otherwise-empty lives are probably a few days from having the DTs because I haven't done one in a while. So, as a New York humanitarian (1) it is only right that I stop churning out a stream of boring slop about COVID drugs and vaccines and get back to my roots as a chemist. It's the least I can do to appease all both of my devoted chemistry followers. Today, we discuss rhodium – one of the rarest and most valuable of all the elements. 

Chances are that you know, or have at least heard about, someone who heads out to their car, starts...

1. If you don't have HBO, and if you have HBO but you don't watch John Oliver's "Last Week Tonight", and if you do ordinarily watch but missed the August 13th episode...well, you didn't miss much.

We're a science non-profit with $2 billion in activists lined up against us, we have had world-class hit pieces done against science at their bequest, in places like "60 Minutes" and "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart." John Oliver instead exposed himself as being a pretender in the science community, siding readily with trade group hacks out to undermine American expertise. By comparison, rather than being a humorous or at least sharp take, his attack was instead flaccid....

Rachel Carson, who was born on May 27, 1907, and launched the modern environmental movement with her 1962 book “Silent Spring,” was a highly private person. But on one occasion she allowed an interviewer to ask, “What do you eat?” Her sardonic answer: “Chlorinated hydrocarbons like everyone else.”

Carson was referring to a family of chemicals used for insect control that included DDT, the principal target of her book. Even though Carson tragically died of cancer just 18 months after publication of “Silent Spring,” her best-seller had powerful and lasting effects. Congress moved to create a new federal Environmental Protection Agency in 1970, and two years later that agency banned DDT for...

Gary Ruskin, the chief junkyard dog of US Right To Know, an industry front group created by Organic Consumers Association to harass and intimidate scientists, has managed to pay-to-publish a Short Article which allows him to claim he has been in a peer-reviewed journal.

That has to be placed in context. In an open-access digital world, where thousands of predatory journals now exist which allow anyone to buy the right to claim they have been peer-reviewed, being peer-reviewed doesn't mean what it used to mean. If I gather five astrologers to review some article on astrology and put it in an online astrology...

Inspired by the extraordinary artistry of medical illustrator and aspiring surgeon, Dr. Raf Ratinam, in my piece From Anatomy to 3D Printing: Art Inspires Life, I decided to expand the discussion. Yes, his animations and mastery of anatomy acquired through graduate level medical training and now a PhD pursuit permits endless possibilities for his future career path.

But, it also begs the question: Are there roles for others so creatively or empathetically inclined to contribute to the field of medicine without partaking in the arduous and formal, traditional medical school track? An emphatic yes would be my response.

We tend...