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The American Council on Science and Health writes at least 1,300 original articles on our website, produces five books, and writes science op-eds in America's largest newspapers every month. That means we get a lot of media traction. Here is who used our work this past week.

1. Alternative Daily calls out Environmental Working Group (EWG). A partisan anti-science activism publication rightly notes that EWG has now taken to terrifying people about water everywhere in the US. Those litigation-motivated frauds insist 250 million Americans are exposed to excessively high amounts of chromium-6 in water without noting that the amounts they talk about are harmless. While bad if inhaled, Cr-6 can't cause problems when ingested.

After promoting...

One of our missions at ACSH is to change the media narrative about science and health. Too often, the media publishes "click bait" with the intention of scaring people or promoting a new food fad. That does a disservice to the public.

We aim to rectify this by getting quoted in as many media outlets as possible. Wherever you go, there we are. And here's where we appeared recently:

(1) Forbes cited our article on how organic pesticides may be bad for wine production. Just because something is "natural" doesn't mean it's better. Organic winemakers like to use copper sulfate as a...

Philadelphia, the city with one of the highest incidences of drug overdoses, announced yesterday support for “comprehensive user engagement sites”– a facility where drug-addicted individuals can use their drugs under the nominal supervision of nurses. Referrals can be made for addiction services.

While the media outlets have all widely broadcast their decision, a closer look indicates that Philadelphia has “yet to announce a framework for overseeing the program, potential locations, or a timeline for when sites could open.” I found no information on funding at all, so the announcement is perhaps at best a trial balloon and signal of intent. City officials are clear that this is just part rather than a complete solution; it is a harm-reduction strategy. Philadelphia’s decision is...

1. In his regular bi-weekly radio spot, Dr. Alex Berezow talked about a study showing that conventional farms are better than the organic kind - by far, how scientists in Europe would like to fight back against the political war on biotechnology, which threatens to leave them behind for a generation, torn ACLs in athletes, and much more.

http://kvi.com/podcast/kirbycast-september-25th-3pm-hour

http://kvi.com/podcast/kirbycast-september-20th-3pm-hour

2. In Smithsonian, they covered our work on...

ByeBye cigs, Hello e-cigsThe well-respected NYTimes columnist Jane Brody has been around a long, long time, and we here at ACSH often use her column for its worthwhile information for our readers. Today s piece, More Worries Rise From the Ashes, is in stark contrast to those, unfortunately. And this topic presented her with a great opportunity to do her readers a major service instead...

In a world of fake news, scientists tend to find comfort within the pages of the scientific literature. While peer review is far from perfect and science often wrong, the process finds the truth in the long-run.

The gatekeepers of science -- that is, the people tasked with editing the scientific journals -- have an incredibly important job. They must decide which research deserves to be published and which does not. Other journal editors publish essays and articles for general consumption rather than scientific manuscripts. Regardless of one's exact role, what all editors have in common is the privilege of facilitating dialogue among the scientific community and its stakeholders.

As we have rightly come to expect, with great privilege comes great responsibility. That's...

Cancer Screening Déjà Vu

In its coverage of a new blood test that is being billed as a method to detect colon cancer, U.S. News is appropriately skeptical: “But while the ColoMarker test may well have all the potential in the world, based on the information available so far, ‘it is unproven as a screening measure,’ writes Durado Brooks, director of prostate and colorectal cancer at the American Cancer Society...Like the highly controversial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, ColoMarker is a blood test that looks for a protein whose levels may be elevated in people with a...

California is a trendsetter.  

It’s home to world-class wine, championship basketball teams, beautiful weather, and legendary cities like San Francisco. But my home state, sadly, is also a trendsetter when it comes to wrongheaded public health policy. There’s no better example of this than Proposition 65, a law that has cost California businesses close to $300 million as of 2016.

Originally approved by voters in 1986, the law empowers the state government to regulate the use of chemicals, over 800 and counting, that it deems toxic to human health and the environment. Scientific shortcomings aside, the language of Prop. 65 has exposed California’s businesses to an...

Non-communicable diseases are often associated with our behavior; tobacco remains the poster child and efforts at reduction in its use has provided lessons on how to affect similar change for other health concerns. In a new review in the Journal of Studies of Alcohol and Drugs, the subject is alcohol, but it could just as well be Big Sugar or in some alternate future, Big Marijuana. So what works, what policy tools can we employ to nudge behavior away from substances that can cause harm. Spoiler alert – education is not on the list.

The abuse of alcohol is believed to be, in part responsible, for about 5% of global deaths and by World Health Organization estimates accounts for about 4% of our global “disease burden.” The current review looks at preventative interventions...

If 20 years ago you had told the American Council on Science and Health that tobacco company stocks would be outpacing the S&P 500 by 600 percent for investor return in the two-year period leading into 2016, we'd have thought you were proposing some bizarre science-fiction story. While I understand the power of addiction, that is only an issue for smokers; and future generations would be far more aware of the dangers of smoking and not become smokers, I'd have argued.

"Smoking is an IQ test by now," I'd have said, "no one will be doing it then." That's because young people would be smarter and learn from our mistakes, and not get addicted...