Colorectal Cancer

Sixty-five percent of those diagnosed with invasive cancer during 2003 to 2010 survived for five years or longer after their diagnosis, according to a recent report from the CDC. This is an increase from 64 percent fr
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Colorectal cancer (CRC), or colon cancer, is the third most common cancer worldwide, and the second leading cause of cancer death. According to the Colon Cancer Alliance, the exact
Dr. J Cuzick from the Queen Mary University of London and international colleagues from several institutions performed a review of studies linking the use of aspirin to decreased risk of several types of cancer and of heart attacks and stroke.
Physicians and scientists at the American Council on Science and Health (ACSH) reported today that colorectal cancer (CRC), the leading cause of cancer in nonsmokers, may be up to 80 percent preventable through screening and alteration of lifestyle factors. Colorectal cancer is second only to lung cancer as a cause of death from cancer. Without preventive action, about one in every 17 Americans will be diagnosed with CRC,
In this report we will look at some common myths about colorectal cancer (CRC); describe findings from the past decade of research that have countered those myths; and comment on what the future may hold. In 1997 approximately 131,000 Americans will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and about 55,000 Americans will die from the disease. In the United States CRC is second only to lung cancer as a cause of death from cancer; it is the most common cause of cancer death among nonsmokers. People in the U.S. have an approximately 6 percent lifetime probability of developing CRC, which means that without preventive action about one in every 17 Americans will be diagnosed with CRC.