Weekend Update - Multiple Laudits for ACSH, and All the News You Missed

By Hank Campbell — Mar 21, 2016
At American Thinker, Dr. John Dunn lauds American Council on Science and Health Scientific Advisor Dr. Frank Schnell, former toxicologist for the U.S. government, and his concern that the EPA long ago ran out of problems to solve, so they have been manufacturing new ones by redefining hazards until they cover something.

At American Thinker, Dr. John Dunn lauds American Council on Science and Health Scientific Advisor Dr. Frank Schnell, former toxicologist for the U.S. government, and his concern that the EPA long ago ran out of problems to solve, so they have been manufacturing new ones by redefining hazards until they cover something.

You can read Dr. Schnell here and in our latest issue of Priorities magazine.

Krista Boehm at Valley News North Dakota has good news for dog owners -- those adorable hounds are correlated with greater heart health, and she cites our article on the matter, though as always a little skepticism is in order when someone finds two curves that match and imply causation.

Jessica Alba Honest except not

Inc. magazine cited Dr. Josh Bloom, American Council on Science and Health Senior Director of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, in Why Jessica Alba's Honest Company Is Struggling to Defend Itself. Scribe says it was "over the top" but what is really over the top is that a company ironically named Honest is so adeptly bilking people to the tune of a $1.8 billion valuation -- and that more journalists have not called its personnel out. Scientists certainly have.

Sugar or Artificial Sweetener?

Augusta Free-Press answered some questions about sugar from a concerned reader, and they struck a balanced tone by citing us. We have long genetically engineered foods to have more calories and be sweeter and tastier, but now agriculture is so scientifically terrific even the poorest people can afford to be fat.

But sugar is not poison, regardless of what food fad is being touted in the New York Times this week. Its biggest mistake: The journalist cites a naturopath.

“Our ancestors probably consumed 20 teaspoons (100 grams) of sugar per year and we now consume that much per day,” says Dr. Sandy Seeman, a naturopathic doctor ...

You can stop right there. Naturopath, homeopath -- if the title ends in "path" your skepticism filter should probably be set to really high, because they don't believe in science or medicine.

More practical is that they cite our Dr. Bloom, who debunks the weird claims about artificial sweeteners with, “About the only way this stuff could harm you is if you were run over by a truck that was delivering it.”

Mark Bittman is Even More Hypocritical Than You Thought

Mark Bittman has long said GMOs should have mandatory warning labels because the public has a right to know about their food so it is strange that he says for his customers it would be "counterproductive for us to provide nutritional information" -- and that you should just trust him -- at least now that he owns a company selling organic food. Yet when he was spouting anti-science nonsense about other companies, it was, "We have a right to know what’s in the food we eat and a right to know how it’s produced." (H/T Mary Mangan)

Good to know that he understands hypocrisy better than he understands biology.