acrylamide

Ever on the alert to protect consumers from non-existent threats, E.U. member states have voted to set legal limits on the amount of acrylamide in foods. Acrylamide, of course, is the chemical naturally formed when foods containing large amounts of carbohydrates are cooked at high temperatures — think fried and baked potatoes and bread. And we predict that no-one's health will benefit from this ruling.
Here we go again. Given that there are literally thousands of chemicals to pick on, we can only wonder why scaremongers keep returning again and again to the old ones, like acrylamide. This time, if you can believe it, British consumers were recently warned to avoid browning their toast or other starchy foods.
Do you "hold the fries?" You might want to if your pants buttons start blowing off. But don't do so because of a deep-fried, phony chemical scare: acrylamide. 
A group in the UK is cautioning people against well-done potatoes. Here's why they are wrong.
Lovers of french fries, rejoice: the new, non-bruising potato has hit the market. The Idaho spud joins a list of GM products designed to appeal to the consumer. But will people put their GM taters (and bucks) where their mouths are? Read more.
The USDA approved for commercial sale the Innate potato, produced by the JR Simplot company last November. The product is still waiting for FDA approval, who is in the process of reviewing the data. Innate potatoes produce less acrylamide than usual when
What appears to be a big decision by McDonald s to keep using their current potatoes rather than switch to GM potatoes turns out to be, at least scientifically, no decision at all. This is because on this particular
Activists are attacking Starbucks because its coffee like everyone else s coffee contains acrylamide. This is not because the company actually adds the chemical to its coffee, nor does anyone else it is formed naturally when the beans are roasted.
Hasn t the European Union s European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) ever heard the (very) old adage that the dose makes the poison? From what they say in their latest report on acrylamide, it does not appear so.
You might want to tell the waiter to hold those french fries to cut down on the amount of acrylamide you re consuming. Well at least according to the FDA. Acrylamide is a chemical that forms in foods containing