atrazine

A new study purports to link some pesticides with obesity. Really? This sloppy study, based on both dietary and pesticide exposure while utilizing statistical manipulations and ad-hoc, exposure-intensity criteria, should be relegated to the junkpile of anti-pesticide zealotry.
An informative Washington Examiner article by T. Becket Adams hits the nail on the head in explaining the major problem plaguing science that ACSH has worked to combat: junk studies, and the sloppy media coverage that ensues. The piece also includes quotes from many experts associated with ACSH.
Atrazine, one of the most effective and commonly used herbicides (weed-killers) in the world, is back in the news. Today s New York Times international business article discusses disparities in regulations that complicate Trans-Atlantic trade. Specifically
Will wonders never cease? Strident toxic atrazine mythologizer Tyrone Hayes of UC-Berkeley finds no evidence of amphibian effects from the common, safe and effective herbicide.
Hank Campbell of Science 2.0 points out the vast gulf between journalism and pandering in an irresponsible way merely to get attention, whatever the cost to sound science and public health. Same concern applies to phony research targeting chemicals.