Big Pharma

Is it possible that patient advocates have hidden conflicts of interest? That they accept funding from Big Pharma, the du jour villains of healthcare? Further, was the ever-cynical Television Doc right in his assessment of patients' ability to tell the truth?
When pharmaceutical companies jack up prices, it irritates everybody. And when people are irritated, politicians take the opportunity to do some grandstanding to win votes. Just a few days into its term, the House Oversight Committee in the new Congress has already launched an investigation into drug pricing. Is that justified? Not really.
The Trump Administration believes that TV ads for pharmaceutical drugs should display the list price. This helps toward lowering the cost of healthcare. However, officials might want to consider banning direct-to-consumer advertising altogether.
The gloves are off in a battle to control the sector. Nearly 83% of hospitals are charging over twice the cost for medicines, with a majority of mark-ups between 200 and 400%. Will any fixes in store actually help patients?
The U.S. Court of Appeals just delivered another blow to a rather-clever-but-cunning play by Allergan, the pharmaceutical giant, to game the patent system.
The ubiquitous, on-screen advertising about prescription drugs is highly structured by the FDA. That helps explain why the voice-over's claims and cautions are delivered so quickly at the end of the commercial. 
Intermountain Health, a Utah-based non-profit, announced it will be leading an effort that controls 450 U.S. hospitals to make a strategic play in the generic drug market. But will fighting a consolidated industry with consolidation reduce drug costs?
People who see corporate shills everywhere they look are no different from run-of-the-mill conspiracy theorists. And some of them are MDs.
Columbia University Professor Jeffrey Sachs is one of the world's most influential public intellectuals. His war against global poverty is commendable, if not always congenial. His expertise is rightly sought by national and international media outlets. It's strange, then, for someone of his knowledge, accomplishment, and reputation to repeat verifiably untrue claims. A recent exchange on Twitter reveals that, at times, Dr. Sachs has merely a casual relationship with the truth. Jeffrey Sachs's War on the Pharmaceutical Industry
The aftermath of the heparin crisis should put to rest any notions that there's a conspiracy to suppress a cure for cancer; to control your mind with fluoride; to hide a link between vaccines and autism; or to treat Americans as guinea pigs for GMOs. If there was any truth to those beliefs, somebody would have uncovered it by now.
The "portmanteau" - combining two words to make a new one - was not invented by Lewis Carroll in 1871, it had been used half a century earlier when Massachusetts Governor Elbridge Gerry created a serpentine political district and gave rise to the term "gerrymandering", but it certainly took off after being used to such good effect in "Th
One important medical conditions in this country obesity has been an elusive target for researchers and drug companies. And now, since Orexigen the makers Contrave, have pulled the plug on the LIGHT clinical trial, the number of new diet drugs has droppe