biotech

With the hope of increasing accessibility for a burdensome medical issue, can this application actually make a dent as a screening or diagnostic tool?
With fountain-of-youth and cancer-cure promises galore, what's actually transformative -- and happening now -- might surprise you. The key is where to look.
Despite having yet to save the life of a mouse, an Israeli company is making grandiose pronouncements. However, if you look beyond the hype the medical approach is actually pretty interesting.
Synthetic biology is like genetic engineering on steroids. Using cutting-edge computational design, synthetic biology aims to design novel biological molecules -- or even entire metabolic systems. Here's a plan to use this new technology to develop a world-changing treatment for Celiac disease. 
Medicare doesn't dispute how much pharmaceutical companies charge for their drugs. This laxity has inevitably led to the program being fleeced by them – to the tune of over a billion dollars. And that's just for a drug that doesn't even need to be in use.
At long last, the FDA approved biotech salmon, AquaAdvantage, which is bred to grow to twice the size of other fish. But in contrast to every scientific study and advisory, the editorial board of The New York Times writes that the genetically-modified fish should be labelled. We take issue with that position.
While a field trial of genetically-modified wheat failed to reach its goal (of repelling destructive aphids), the progress made in incorporating relevant genetic traits into the wheat genome will yield more information for better outcomes later.
Dr. Robert Fraley, a top researcher at Monsanto, was recently quoted in a Nebraska Radio Network article, stating that he believed that those opposing GMOs are extreme voices and that most people are in the middle. Dr. Fraley, who is often referred to as the father of agricultural biotechnology, according to
Last December, Hawaii County passed a bill that banned biotech companies from the Big Island and prohibited all new genetically modified crops.
Can we turn down the heat while turning on the light on the controversial issue of labelling (or not) GMO food products? Maybe: just use your app! An idea endorsed by two recent USDA secretaries and the NY Times Andrew Revkin and it makes sense! Will the anti-GMO crusaders agree? (hint: doubt it).
Genetically-engineered (biotech, GMO) crops are increasingly being utilized by farmers worldwide, with major benefits to them, and to consumers as well. One crop not being so developed: GMO wheat. Why is there none planted nor on the horizon?
A new survey of 1,000 adults finds widespread agreement with the FDA s position on (not) labeling food with GMO ingredients. It seems anti-biotech activists are just louder than everyone else but the public isn t buying it. Good for them.