Bisphenol A

Too many journalists are experts in nothing and behave like partisans and activists. That's how a journalist can go on social media and celebrate that her poor reporting caused a company to lose hundreds of millions in market capitalization.
Now that I'm in the second trimester, I'm starting to think about baby bottles, sippy cups, and all that fun stuff. But all the options online leave me thinking I don't have much choice when it comes to BPA-free bottles. And I don't mean lack there of. 
NYTimes discusses the shady industry of herbal supplements, Caliofrnia's Prop. 65 targets e-cigs for their nicotine, and more support for BPA comes from the European Food Safety Authority
Researchers from South Korea s Seoul University College of Medicine and its Department of Environmental Health did a double-blind, crossover study of 60 older people to detect an effect of bisphenol-A (BPA) on blood pressure. Their results gave them a basis for asserting a
A recent study examining the association between prenatal BPA exposure and lung function has been making headlines, often with titles similar to BPA linked to asthma. However, the actual study is about as
Kudos to Health Canada (the Canadian equivalent of our FDA) in spite of the fact that Canada was the first country in the world to basically prohibit the use of BPA (bisphenol A) in baby bottles, they continued to do due diligence on the substance.
For years, various environmental and academic groups have been desperately trying to explain how it can be that high doses of chemicals (a common target: bisphenol-A, BPA), referred to as
If you follow BPA (bisphenol-A) on your Google news alert, no one would blame you for being surprised that you actually woke up the next morning. BPA, which is reacted with another chemical to form ubiquitous polycarbonate plastics, and also used as is on cash register receipts, may be the most studied substance ever, which is especially ironic, since no one has ever found any evidence of an adverse effect on human health.
If you thought you d seen all the putative risks to health from the chemical bisphenol-A (BPA), think again. It s been one of the most frequently cited supposedly dangerous chemicals in fear-mongers armamentaria.
We at ACSH have written countless pieces on the absolute garbage science surrounding BPA a chemical that has been in use for more than 50 years. The primary use of BPA the manufacture numerous plastics. So, it is only natural that we give a huge shout-out to Trevor Butterworth, a journalist and master junk science (especially statistics) debunker, who has an impressive pedigree of editorial and media exposure.
This 2005 report by the American Council on Science and Health reviews the evidence and finds that low doses of bisphenol A (BPA) aren't a threat to human health.