caffeine

The pandemic isn't making the world any brighter. Insecticides are being sold online to treat or prevent COVID-19 -- and people are buying them. Speaking of pesticides, you probably had a healthy dose of one this morning and it's more toxic than DDT. Drink up!
Is being overweight in childhood linked to mom's prenatal caffeine intake? If it is, it's not terribly well supported by this new study published in BMJ.
A teenager's recent death from caffeine consumption inspired this article, mainly because people may not realize that caffeine, in large amounts, can be toxic. Another inspiration was to highlight some very cool, but little known, research that tests just how toxic caffeine is. Read this – and you'll never look at a spider web the same way again.
The proliferation of coffee shops and energy drinks clearly shows that caffeine is in high demand. The stimulant is even added to some medicine. However, because only a handful of plants produce it, there has been some interest in creating caffeine synthetically.
Caffeine-fueled energy drinks can provide a quick pick-me-up, and they're popular among young men in particular. But too much a good thing can be dangerous, and if combined with alcohol they can lead to serious health issues.
Caffeine junkies, we know the struggle is real. The risks versus benefits of coffee have been debated for some time, and the latest findings point to good news: Caffeine does not make our hearts flutter, despite popular belief.
The world of supplements took another hit this week, as FDA officials announced that they were cracking down on companies selling pure, powered caffeine, the active component in energy drinks. It s actually more dangerous than it sounds.
Energy drinks can pose a health risk to children and adolescents, due to their high caffeine content. And a recent review from a consumer advocacy group says these drinks should not be sold or marketed at all to children under age 18.
A new study, released this week and slated to be presented at the American Academy of Neurology meetings in April, found a link between coffee consumption a lot of it and a reduced incidence of multiple sclerosis. It s a pretty slim thread, however.
A recent article by Michelle Cortez, writing for Bloomberg News, reviews a report from the American Heart Association s meeting on the risk to children of highly caffeinated energy drinks.
The FDA has posted a warning about the dangers of powdered caffeine. Caffeine? Yes, caffeine. Everyone has heard of caffeine that natural stimulant in coffee, tea and colas that helps students stay up to cram, and perks sleepy workers up from that mid-morning slump. We tend to not realize that, like all other drugs, there s a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde aspect to caffeine, and now the Mr. Hyde side has come to the forefront.
A few years ago, the FDA mandated that four companies remove their alcoholic energy drinks from the market after concluding that the products were unsafe and illegal. Now, a group of researchers at the Australian National University s Centre for