DNA sequencing

Protected personal health information has traditionally been exempt from privacy concerns, given the unique nature of its scope and regulation, until the advent of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing, forced implementation of electronic medical records (EMRs) and prescription drug monitoring programs. With such a recent public focus on Facebook’s misleading policies over use of our data, Europe’s reactive efforts to govern the internet and the latest action to get the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 on the...

For decades the potential of stem cells to cure all disease was promised. Today’s reality is that the few worthy dividends reflect a very small part of the mostly unregulated landscape of stem cell profit centers overpromising, and often dangerously under-delivering. Now branded as Regenerative Medicine, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is forced to overcorrect the harms done by rogue stem cell enterprises in concert with a multi-country global effort by scientists to do the same (see here and here, complications range from blindness to death). And the cycle...

The Dubai Health Authority (DHA) is taking the label "human genome project" to the next level by undertaking a project known as the Dubai 10X initiative. The ambitious project will sequence the DNA of all of the residents of Dubai - 3 million people - with the first phase focusing on UAE nationals.

In the first phase of the project, which is projected to take about 24 months and is set to start this summer, the DHA is planning to collect samples, analyze DNA, and record the results in a database.

The plans for the second and third phase are murky, but, are proposed to involve automated learning and artificial intelligence in addition to collaborations with interested pharmaceutical...

In the old days, genetic disease diagnoses were identified by the disease first, using the trait that the person had. If you couldn't stop bleeding, it was hemophilia. Black urine meant alcaptonuria. It was not until recently that genetic diseases could be identified by sequencing the DNA first, finding the mutation, and then notifying the person of their disease. (1) 

In today's world, genetic diseases can be identified far more quickly and well before someone is exhibiting the associated trait. In fact, they can be made in under a day. 

How quickly can a genetic disease be diagnosed? 

Scientists at the Rady Children’s Institute for Genomic Medicine...