eggs

As part of the "natural is better" movement, many Americans -- particularly those who live in the city and know absolutely nothing about agriculture -- have decided that playing farmer is a fun pastime. It certainly can be a fun hobby... that is, until the vomiting and diarrhea begin.

The CDC reports that 10 separate Salmonella outbreaks, affecting 48 states and DC, has sickened 790 people and hospitalized at least 174. The outbreaks have been linked to hatcheries where people handled ducklings and chicks.

Chickens and other poultry can carry Salmonella. Not only can this pathogen be found in their feces and environment, it can also be found on egg shells. That's why, according to...

We've described research indicating that the cholesterol content of egg yolks shouldn't prevent most people from gaining the nutritional benefits that eggs can provide (see here, for example). And now some recent research suggests that contrary to popular belief, egg consumption may actually alter a person's cholesterol profile for the better. The report was published in the Journal of Nutrition.

Dr. Diana M. DiMarco and colleagues from the University of Connecticut in Storrs enlisted 38 young, healthy men and women between the ages of 18 and 30, none of whom were...

Some new controversy has been cooked up recently about eggs - which is a bit hard to unscramble (ok, ok - that's enough.) 

Controversy over eggs is like controversy over puppies. Or a bouquet of tulips. Or the Oscar for Best Picture.... well, forget that last one.

This time, it's not the usual "there's too much cholesterol" or "only eat the white parts" - neither of which have any basis in science, by the way. Now, the concern that is being echoed on natural food sites across the internet is that particular methods of cooking eggs, scrambling them in particular, is dangerous because heating the yolk can convert the cholesterol in it into the most dangerous form of cholesterol - very low density lipoprotein (VLDL.) 

In fact, on the website Terrific Fitness,...

Because of their high cholesterol content, eggs were seen as dietary villains by many, in spite of their being sources of high quality protein, low levels of total and saturated fats, and a number of other nutritional benefits (for more on eggs, read here ). More recently, however, research has demonstrated that dietary cholesterol is not an important precursor to levels of LDL ("bad") cholesterol in the human body for most people. Thus nutritionists have been less likely to demonize egg consumption and admit that they do have substantial nutritional value.

According to a recent study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, animal...

As with many other foods, egg purveyors present a variety of eggs (and we still mean only those produced by chickens) for consumers to choose from. So many, in fact, that one is likely to be confused by the labels — what's the difference between brown eggs and white, or between free-range and cage-free eggs? Or is there one? To demystify the labeling of these sources of complete protein and other nutrients, we searched the website of the Egg Nutrition Center to try to make some sense out of the egg marketplace. We've done this before, but in the year or so since then, even more categories have been added. Some...

A hearty breakfast is the way to start the day, right? Maybe not so much any longer, because breakfast foods seem to be leaking into lunch and even dinner times these days. Perhaps you sleep late or work through the traditional breakfast time, but not to worry — food purveyors have your back. According to an article from the American Egg Board (we admit, perhaps a slightly biased source), at chains such as McDonald's, White Castle and Golden Corral you can get breakfast foods all...

Hard-boiled eggs (Credit: Shutterstock)

Boiling an egg is useful. It kills bacteria, such as Salmonella, which may be on or even inside the egg. Heat treatment also triggers chemical reactions (specifically, protein crosslinking) that convert the egg into a gel, which makes it tastier and far easier to eat.

However, these same chemical reactions can also cause heated eggs to smell like farts. (This is particularly true of hard-boiled eggs.) A major protein inside the egg, called ovalbumin, possesses the sulfur-containing amino acid cysteine. When heated, these sulfur atoms are converted to hydrogen sulfide, the nasty gas associated with rotten eggs and bodily functions. It doesn't take much to wrinkle our noses....

shutterstock_264610943 Eggs courtesy of Shutterstock

We've said it before egg consumption, indeed dietary cholesterol intake, is not a major risk factor for heart disease. A new study from Finland bolsters the strength of that conclusion even...

1428595_35370853Eggs were once thought to be linked to an increased risk of heart disease due to the cholesterol-rich yolks. Groups like the American Heart Association quickly promoted this idea, advising people not to consume the yolk. However, the fact is that dietary cholesterol does not have much of an effect on blood cholesterol.

Clinical studies support this fact. A study published in JAMA in 1999 that looked at two...