genetics

We've been told for decades that less is more when it comes to salt in the diet. Recent research has thrown that conclusion into doubt. Can we identify children who may be at risk for SIDS before it suddenly and tragically strikes?
Is type 2 diabetes due largely to genetics? Does veganism lead to more weight loss than other common diets? On episode 9 of the Science Dispatch Podcast, we take a critical look at two studies, each tackling one of these intriguing questions.
On Episode 6 of the Science Dispatch Podcast, ACSH contributor Susan Goldhaber explains the genetic underpinnings of Alopecia areata, an autoimmune disease affecting some 2.5 million Americans—including Jada Pinkett Smith. Now that Will Smith's so-called "slap heard 'round the world" has faded from the headlines, let's discuss the science behind the infamous Oscar meltdown. We then examine fiber's exaggerated health benefits and the anti-GMO movement's descent into obscurity.
A recent study has helpfully advanced our understanding of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Some journalists exaggerated the paper's results in their rush to publish stories. Fortunately, other reporters helpfully and publicly corrected the errors. This is how the media should always operate.
A lot has been written about the strengths and weaknesses of using DNA testing to customize individual diets. It's a promising idea, but our knowledge of genetics isn't yet good enough to pinpoint what each of us should eat.
A new paper claiming that the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus was genetically engineered in a laboratory has several red flags. It should not be taken seriously.
The general belief is that COVID-19’s harms fall disproportionately upon the frail, as well as the classes and groups that often find themselves holding the short end of the stick: the poor and minorities. What makes these groups so susceptible? Let's take a look.
Your dog doesn't need to drink orange juice. There are evolutionary and biochemical reasons why humans need to consume vitamin C but dogs -- and many other animals -- do not.
On this week's menu: Why is it harder to get a Chick-fil-A franchise than to get into Stanford? ... The CVS-Aetna monopoly on pharmaceuticals would put John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil to shame. ... Wind may not be as green an energy sources as we thought. ... And finally, the genes we share: we are more alike than not.
Wheat breeding did not contribute to changes in celiac antigenicity in hard red spring wheat. This type of wheat is unique because it has relatively high protein content, which contributes to superior baking quality. Thus, it's in high demand in the global wheat market.
A study of the health effects of alcohol separates the population by a genetic difference: the ability to metabolize alcohol. Researchers found no benefit to drinking, moderate or not. Is it true? Maybe if you're Chinese.
A new study reveals that reduced telomere length is associated with childhood trauma in those with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Does this new research make a compelling case for its use in the real, not theoretical, world?