patient safety

The adverse effects on patient safety from poor hospital scheduling and staffing are well known. This occurs when there's a shortage of experienced physicians and health professionals at work during non-standard hours. Maternal health is the latest focus.
The FDA's current regulatory framework is out of whack -- and it comes at the expense of patient safety. The Wild West of "stem cell" clinics continues. This time, patients are hospitalized with blood infections to spinal abscesses.
The systematic erosion of continuity of care has financial and personal health costs. This is well-known, especially to health professionals, and it's supported by overwhelming evidence. And yet, it persists.
When it comes to medical fundraising on social media, you may be gambling with the highest of stakes.
With hospital accreditation in itself a big business, it might be time for some oversight of such oversight.
It's time doctors and patients take charge of what goes on in the exam room or at the hospital bedside. Inane, tedious tasks that co-opt such visits are out of touch with real world medical practice.
When health insurers keep trying to practice medicine without a license, we all lose. 
Identifying characteristics are essential to ensuring patient safety, so that the right treatment meets the right patient. 
If health care fixes continue to undermine the doctor-patient relationship, financial costs won't be the only price paid.
Hospital Compare, a CMS website, provides "star-ratings" to hospitals based on performance. It's dropping the safety measures from the star-rating scoring, but it's maintaining the information in another database. Does removing safety measures make the ratings less useful? The answer is, as is often the case, complicated.
A recent Pennsylvania Supreme court ruling, recognizing what it means to be a doctor, is not a solution but a problem. Authors in The New England Journal of Medicine beg to differ.  
With a constant surge of competing profit centers fragmenting healthcare, more layers than ever are conspiring to erode the doctor-patient relationship. Here is a guide to being your own advocate. It will help reduce your anxiety, eliminate unnecessary suffering and improve outcome and recovery.