precautionary principle

Better safe than sorry. That's a great lesson for a child when a parent explains why she should wear a helmet when riding her bicycle. But that refrain makes for terrible public health policy.
Gene editing – a brilliant demonstration of how basic research can yield world-revolutionizing technology – is seen as unsafe in Europe. The good news is that some scientists aren't going to sit idly by while Europe attempts to destroy an entire field of scientific research. The scientists are striking back.
A viral video by "Attn:", an activist website that produces extremely popular segments, is spreading lies about food processing in the United States and Europe. Don't fall for it.
When self-driving cars become the norm, our grandchildren will be shocked to learn that humans used to drive cars, and that nearly 40,000 Americans died every year because of them. Self-driving cars are a true revolution in the making. The more we test them now, the sooner the revolution arrives.
A new version of the Toxic Substances Control Act, called "reform," is well on its way to passage in Congress. Why is this necessary? It's not but a strange alliance of anti-chemical activists and some industry collaborators seem to agree that more onerous, expensive regulation is a good thing.
A well-written and illustrative article in the Washington Post explains a great deal about the U.N.'s International Agency for Research on Cancer, and Monsanto's herbicide glyphosate, Roundup. It should be required reading for Americans concerned about the chemical, as well as GMO food. We'll explain.
We exercise reasonable precaution with new products and technology, right? Sure we do! But the Precautionary Principle, as it's most often invoked, would bring scientific and industrial progress to a grinding halt.
A ban instituted at the behest of anti-science NGOs and their donors people who had little familiarity with science or farming or farmers - in Europe should be removed.
A cogent opinion piece in The Times of London exposes the fallacy of the EU s precautionary ban of a safe and effective class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids. Their ban is not based on actual evidence, but rather politics and agenda.
Denmark s political agenda against endocrine disrupting phthalates brought to a halt by the authorities of the EU. Wiser heads prevail, unusual over there, but there is no solid evidence that phthalate plasticizers are harmful.
A Wall Street Journal Op-ed by a member of the EU Parliament decries the direction being taken by science there: it s back to the dark ages as fear trumps evidence.
By Thomas R. DeGregori