President Donald Trump

Often considered meaningless use or meaningful abuse by those who actually practice medicine, the so-called meaningful use reform legislation, included in Congress’ government funding bill just signed by President Donald Trump, with respect to electronic health records (EHRs) is a necessary step toward assuaging somewhat the real life onerous nature of EHR implementation. The bill hopes to ease the mandated increasingly stringent...

With the weaponizing of presidential health taking center stage throughout the election and beyond, culminating in the most transparent press conference ever regarding the subject (see here), the spotlight was placed on President Trump’s White House physician Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson’s conclusions over a routine physical. Yes, that’s important, but what was revealed of equal to greater importance was just how integrally involved Dr. Jackson is in the daily life of a president. 

Being the first physician to serve three administrations AND be the appointed Physician to the President for two presidents (currently President Trump and formerly President Obama) speaks volumes...

President Donald Trump is fit for duty - medically, mentally, cognitively, psychologically, emotionally, physically and otherwise. In quite frankly the most transparent briefing on presidential health in recent memory, White House physician Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson confirmed this at a press conference yesterday whose Q&A portion lasted nearly an hour when he released a verbal and formally written medical assessment that reflects a thorough, comprehensive evaluation.

Dressed in his official U.S. Navy military uniform, Jackson made clear the President insisted on full disclosure, "He said, 'I want you to get out there and I want you to talk to them and I want you to answer every single question they have.' " He was told Press Secretary Sarah Sanders was to give him the podium...

With the focus in the last few weeks on President Trump’s first routine physical in office and the published description that Friday’s exam at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center went “exceptionally well,” the internet - in particular, twitter - went wild about such a description.

Taking a moment to google a prior report released from the same doctor would have revealed a consistent word selection (e.g. “excellent health”) throughout multiple administrations (See President Obama’s medical letter here).

Press Secretary Sarah Sanders had released the following statement:

...

Today is the day President Donald Trump will be experiencing his first medical evaluation in the White House. Yesterday, I discussed with BBC TV's anchor Matthew Amroliwala the many misperceptions and falsehoods that have abounded in the media surrounding such an event. 

With such vitriol in our current public sphere whether it be throughout the presidential campaign or post-election, an unsettling weaponizing of health has taken hold and distorted the perception of the role and duty of the physician, the sanctity of the doctor-patient relationship, the status of innumerable disease states and created a pathway for unapologetic ageism. Such discrimination ran the bipartisan spectrum.

Armchair diagnosing has run amok--whether it be in regard to the President or Secretary...

CNN's Jake Tapper revealed the following about former Governor Mitt Romney:

Tapper reveals Romney received a prostate cancer diagnosis over the summer and was "successfully treated" with a "good" prognosis. Two issues came to mind upon observing this disclosure: 1) Why would the media release personal health information based on so-called sources? If without Mitt Romney's consent, then this is quite disturbing and unethical. 2) As I previously discussed in reference to President Trump's looming physical (see here), is such a revelation...

White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders recently revealed President Donald Trump will undergo his first physical examination at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (see video) on January 12th, affirming the results will be released to the public.

Questions surrounding his and former presidential candidate Secretary Hillary Clinton’s health plagued the political landscape throughout the election. The politicization of this aspect of those running and the subsequent inflammatory dialogue...

Those in Hollywood are in a unique position to do tremendous good given their substantial platform. Unfortunately, with that megaphone comes immense responsibility. While many take that very seriously and share meaningful messages that can spread awareness about disease and its prevention, the speed of the news cycle and the endless modes of social media connection can disseminate misinformation in an instant-- with a global reach.

So, let’s take a look back this year at what we learned from Tinseltown--good, bad and indifferent.

 

Health Outreach

Jack Black and Ed Sheeran are among those who had the right idea because their efforts stemmed from an authentic and caring place.   

A...

Dear Hollywood:

Recently, a video of actor and musician Jack Black visiting children admitted to Children's Hospital Los Angeles was viewed by over a million people, even though it was not even on YouTube. It went viral for a reason that gets lost on a lot of publicists, who instead want their clients (you) to be endorsing the right groups, the right political causes, the right things for your brands.

Black instead just showed he cares about sick kids and wanted to Make March Matter, the name of the CHLA outreach campaign. It was a local initiative, it shouldn't have been popular all...

The squeaky wheel often gets the grease but sometimes wheels get an impassioned champion - and that is just as good. That may have happened with Pompe disease when President Trump, addressing a joint session of Congress, highlighted the presence of 20-year old Notre Dame sophomore Megan Crowley, who is afflicted with it.

Pompe disease results from mutations in the GAA gene which result in the inability of the body to break down the complex sugar called glycogen. That resulting buildup, especially in muscles, prevents them from functioning normally.

It's an inherited disease and relatively rare. According to the National Institutes of Health, Pompe disease affects about 1 in 40,000...