Sugar Substitutes

There's a new sugar substitute called allulose (aka psicose), with properties that could make it a very popular, non-caloric sweetener. But it must be manufactured. It'll be interesting to see how psicose will be received by the anti-sugar substitute psychos.
In just a few days, Diet Pepsi will no longer contain the artificial sweetener aspartame. PepsiCo is replacing aspartame in Diet Pepsi, Caffeine Free Diet Pepsi, and Wild
Dr. Joe Schwarcz, chemistry professor at McGill University, is well known for his able dissections of quackery of all types. In a recent article in the Montreal Gazette, he takes on and (in our opinion) demolishes the attacks on aspartame.
Foods and beverages containing sugar substitutes are widely used in the United States and other countries; they offer attractive dietary options for people who are trying to limit calorie intake and/or reduce the risk of tooth decay. Extensive scientific research supports the safety of the five low-calorie sugar substitutes currently approved for use in foods and beverages in the U.S. acesulfame-K, aspartame, neotame, saccharin, and sucralose. This report by the American Council on Science and Health summarizes the scientific facts about the safety of sugar substitutes.