superfood

Bloomberg's recent hit piece on milk touches upon almost every sensitive issue that worries parents: food, school and their children. Toss in a conspiracy theory about "Big Dairy," and that's how Bloomberg came up with a fear-mongering headline, complete with a disgusting photo that is supposed to make readers feel queasy.
The superfood phenomenon is likely the result of (1) Our cultural obsession with quick fixes and easy answers to complex questions; and (2) Marketing gimmicks that take advantage of widespread scientific illiteracy.
Superhyped: superfoods. The concept is ridiculous, yet wealthy Americans are buying into it big time. Depending on how you define them, superfoods either don't exist at all – or we're surrounded by them. One ACSH advisor, the Director of Medical Nutrition at Columbia University Medical Center, weighs in.
Foodies – and you know who they are – may be turning against quinoa, the healthy grain. It's not because they feel guilty for having made poor people in South America suffer. Instead, it's due to "processing."