vitamin D

More than a third of kids are using dietary supplements. Due to the many preventable, adverse drug reactions they cause – such as arrhythmias and cardiovascular events – researchers set out to quantify pediatric and adolescent intake.
There's simply no benefit to supplemental Calcium or Vitamin D for the patient who is well. So why do we continue to waste our money on these supplements? The US Preventative Services Task Force again weighs in to recommend against their use. 
For the general population and its $6-to-8 billion supplement habit, we're learning that Vitamin D and Calcium supplements do not prevent hip fractures.
Although some observational studies have suggested that vitamin D can help prevent upper respiratory ailments in adults, no such data substantiates that claim for children. A new study that compared low- and high-dose vitamin D with respect to such problems in kids found no effect at either level. Sorry, parents!
A new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association finds that there was no significant reduction of the incidence of all-type cancer in older women receiving Vitamin D and calcium supplements.
A growing number of parents choose to opt out of giving children their daily dose of milk, and switching to alternatives like almond milk or cashew milk. Perhaps they may think the alternatives offer a bit more calcium than real milk — but this is misleading: Real milk contains both calcium and vitamin D (added in the 1930s due to Rickets — a vitamin D deficiency among children), and the presence of vitamin D helps absorb the calcium. 
It's time to take a look at the true level of importance of “sunshine” Vitamin D – in staving off disease, preserving healthy bones and assessing the actual hazards of deficiency and toxicity. 
From the “French baby death linked to vitamin dose” headline, you'd think that the vitamin treatment was responsible.
Vitamin D is crucial for normal growth and development, and in North America much of a child's vitamin D comes from fortified dairy milk. Parents have been advised to give their children reduced fat rather than whole milk — supposedly to decrease the risk of obesity. A new report by Canadian researchers indicates that this advice just might be counterproductive — especially when it comes to vitamin D absorption, and even to obesity.
Americans' use of many (but not all) dietary supplements declined between 1999 and 2012, is welcomed. But the increased use of some -- particularly vitamin D -- can have deleterious health effects. Hopefully, consumers will pay more attention to the science about supplements, and less to hyperbolic media reports about the latest "miracle" supplement.
Women who use estrogen-containing contraceptives may have an increased level of vitamin D in their blood. However, a recent study suggests that the vitamin level can drop if she decides to become pregnant and stops taking the pills. It's important for women and their doctors to be aware of this possibility.
Vitamin D is one of a list of nutrients thought to be valuable in preventing, or treating, a long list of conditions. But according to researchers from the University of Alberta, for most conditions linked to vitamin D the evidence is weak, if not completely non-existent.