alcohol

The famous vodka company cashes in on the anti-science movement, announcing that it was renouncing GMO corn in its famous "No. 21 vodka." What's wrong with GMO corn? Nothing. In fact, it's a net positive for the environment.
A new paper published in the journal Intelligence adds to the body of literature that characterizes how intelligent people differ from others. Mimicking the behaviors of intelligent people will not make a person intelligent, but it could provide a health boost.
A few weeks ago, a paper claimed that an extra glass of wine will shorten your life. The story circled the globe in minutes. A new paper, with better methodology, concluded what we all knew: Moderate alcohol consumption can be integrated into a healthy lifestyle. It, however, won't receive nearly as much attention as the sensationalist report. Such is the power of the academic PR hype machine combined with a gullible, sensationalist press.
A study published in The Lancet concludes that one additional drink per day increases a person's risk of stroke, coronary disease, heart failure, fatal hypertensive disease, and fatal aortic aneurysm. Alcohol may not be to blame, but we can't determine this because the authors didn't even bother to collect data on it.
Our statistical analysis suggests that the further north Americans live, the likelier they may be to drink excessively. Is it due to the long, dark winter nights?
Bravo and Andy Cohen have a wonderful opportunity to start an overdue conversation on misuse of medications and the dangers of polypharmacy.
Pregnancy means letting go of some of your favorite things — temporarily. As she wraps up her fifth month of pregnancy, here's what ACSH's Ana Dolaskie says she misses most. Hint: It rhymes with "shmeer."
The headlines are scary — even one daily alcohol-containing drink causes an increased risk of breast cancer (oh my!) But a closer look at the study giving rise to such headlines should help calm those fears, at least a little.
If someone's lifestyle was represented by the totality of the products advertised during the Super Bowl, the composite picture would be of a sedentary individual with an unhealthy diet, who consumes excessive alcohol and drives everywhere. Do people really live that way? Probably not, but the ads reveal something interesting. 
New research published in the American Journal of Infection Control suggests that professionals who administer breath alcohol tests should stay away from hand sanitizers that contain ethanol, as they can cause breathalyzers to produce a false positive result. That's because the active ingredient is often some kind of alcohol.
Alcohol is both good and bad. Makes some happy, others sad. It amplifies joy, or exacerbates decline. It alienates, it coalesces. It de-stresses, stresses, calms and kills. But you know what? You are the variable. So, then is moderation sexy? Explore your prescription.
The Asian Flush, also known as the Asian Glow, or Alcohol Flush Reaction, can be pretty debilitating. The condition is usually associated with red faces, and flushing of the neck area. But for some of Asian descent, it also results in symptoms such as heightened heart rate, headache, and nausea -- from consuming as little as one alcoholic drink.