BMI

Catch the latest news on declining sale of traditional cigarettes, how BMI affects mortality in older adults, and how another major case of religious exemptions against vaccines is putting lives at risk in one Florida community
For many years Body Mass Index, or BMI, has been the go-to index for establishing trends in population weights, and has also been used to establish what are the best BMIs to avoid certain ailments such as diabetes as well as early death. It has been widely accepted that the relationship of BMI and risk of death, or mortality, is J- or U-shaped.
Although it is well established that obesity ups the risk of numerous health problems, including type 2 diabetes, osteoarthritis and some types of cancer, it has also been
The good news about obesity is that recent trends suggest that its rate of increase in Americans has stabilized. The bad news is that many of us are already overweight or obese, and a significant part of the problem, as suggested by a recent study in The American Journal of Medicine, is a widespread decrease in physical activity.
Top health stories: A shout out to the brilliant Trevor Butterworth and his take on the BPA scare, why you shouldn't run off to the nearest vitamin store before reading our take on Glucosamine, and the real uses and mis-uses, for the Body Mass Index (BMI).
In an entry on the Well New York Times blog, Jane Brody cogently describes the origins and uses (and misuses) of the Body Mass Index or BMI (body weight divided by the square of height).
According to the USDA, about 23.5 million Americans live in areas known as food deserts areas lacking access to fresh fruits and
there is widespread acceptance of the utility of bariatric surgery for severely obese individuals. However, according to a report in JAMA Surgery, there has not been a comprehensive review of and comparison between the various types of bariatric surgery since 2003
Body Mass Index or BMI is a widely used indicator of obesity, and obesity is known to influence health and possibly risk of death. Studies based on BMI, however, have not universally demonstrated that a high BMI is linked to an increased mortality risk.
Sweetened beverages such as sports drinks, sodas, and fruit drinks (excluding 100 percent fruit juice) have been blamed (unfairly, ACSH believes) for the obesity rife among adults and adolescents.