climate change

Many activists and reporters claim we should eat little or no meat to prevent climate change. But instead of presenting arguments, proponents of this radical proposal seek to disqualify their critics with personal attacks.
The Non-GMO Project claims that drought-tolerant crops won't help "feed the world" as climate change threatens crop yields. The evidence says otherwise.
How good is the evidence implicating climate change as a cause of heart attacks? Not very. Let's take a critical look at some of this research.
China is 'seeding' clouds to increase rainfall and fight a severe drought. Will it work? A large body of research shows that soda taxes are ineffective, so why do public health experts continue to endorse them? Finally, has climate change increased the number of heart attacks we suffer? No.
Some 400,000 people attended Woodstock 99 in Rome, New York. The weekend-long music festival ended in preventable disaster, and it offers an important lesson to policymakers and activists eager to ban important technologies.
Climate change is real; we contribute to it. But warmer temperatures aren't driving unprecedented increases in the number of heart attacks we suffer.
Is the climate crisis a population problem or a poverty problem? Are you more disabled as a composer if you are blind or deaf? A Dutch pastime - Uitwaaien Medicare can negotiate prices; what might go wrong?
This summer, there have been more shark sightings, attacks, and public awareness than the summer of “Jaws” in 1975. Systemic infections by fungus are relatively rare in humans (athlete’s foot is a fungal skin infection); one theory holds that our core temperature of 98.6 is a bit too low for most fungal infections to thrive. [1] What do these two seemingly disparate facts have in common – the role of rising temperatures and humans’ biological niche? According to a new study, our rising temperatures may bring us more intense weather and more intense pathogens.
"Climate-anxious" college students are pushing to have low-risk pesticides banned from their campuses. Meanwhile, states that have legalized recreational marijuana use are concerned that their new policy may cause more car accidents. We examine the science behind both stories on episode 14 of the Science Dispatch podcast.
Climate change has now largely supplanted COVID as the main source of hand-wringing and angst in the popular press. Carbon is directly involved in climate change through carbon dioxide (CO2) and airborne elemental carbon particles (EC). COVID-19 has an indirect impact as well. Here I add some details to the fray to insert some clarity and reason.
Suffering from "climate anxiety," some of America's entitled college students are working to get low-risk pesticides banned from their campuses, in a bid to slow global warming. They all need therapy and a basic science lesson.
A new mathematical exercise suggests that if we stop eating beef and simply substitute beans, we can reduce our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 75%. The math is good. But the assumptions? Not so much.