coffee

California has given up all pretense of being a state governed by reason or common sense: Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Elihu Berle ruled that coffee must carry a cancer warning label. The judge’s ruling is scientifically illiterate.

Coffee has been consumed widely since about the 1600’s without any apparent ill effects. Therefore, the scientific burden of proof is on those who say that coffee is dangerous.

Instead, the lawsuit has turned science upside-down by requiring coffee companies to prove that their product isn’t unsafe. That is absurd, not only because it violates 400 years of common sense about coffee, but because it is impossible to prove a negative. Science also cannot prove that ghosts aren’t real. Perhaps all California residences should carry a...

Genetic diversity or lack thereof can have real consequences for our diets, and more importantly, for our health. 

Genetic diversity refers to both the vast numbers of different species as well as the diversity within a species. The greater the genetic diversity within a species, the greater that species' chances of long-term survival. This is because negative traits (such as inherited diseases) become widespread within a population when that population is left to reproduce only with its own members.

Source: biology online dictionary

Here, I'm talking specifically about within species diversity...

A judge in California is going to determine whether or not coffee causes cancer.

Think about that. We live in a society where judges and lawyers -- not medical doctors, scientists, or even a group of really clever AP biology high school students -- get to determine the credibility of biomedical research. The stakes are high: If coffee is deemed carcinogenic, then the State of California will be required to give up all pretense at common sense and sanity.

To give just a small flavor of the level of insanity California has reached, attorney Raphael Metzger and his group's trial lawyer NGO Council for Education and Research on Toxics (CERT - founded by U.C. Berkeley Professor Martyn...

Fads come and go. And come and go again. (Repeat until comatose). So it should come as no surprise that we have another, especially one involving food, which is a superb spawning ground for fads, such as kale (1). It sounds rather stupid: Coffee with nitrogen bubbles. But it's quite popular. Perhaps enough so that it will get its own show on the Food Network—something that we non-cooking bachelors tend to avoid like a roaring case of salmonella. But does the chemistry hold up? Let's take a look.

Let's set preciousness of bubbly coffee aside for a moment. Is there any reason why it might make sense to actually put nitrogen in food or drinks. Possibly so, but first, you will need to sit through... the dreaded chemistry lesson

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The media is alive with a new report sure to satisfy the confirmation bias of a billion people; drinking coffee is good for you!! And evidently, the more, the better.

At least that is what the media has chosen to tell us in their interpretation of an article in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine entitled Association of Coffee Consumption With Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Among Nonwhite Populations.

Aren't these the same media groups that decades ago lifted Center for Science...

Credit: Shutterstock Credit: Shutterstock

Roasting coffee is more art than science. Under-roast the bean, and the chemical reactions necessary to produce its characteristic flavor and color do not occur at an adequate level; over-roast the bean, and the resulting brew is bitter. But, coffee producers and their customers are interested in consistency. Here, the tools of analytical chemistry come in handy. A group of primarily German...

We recently told you that coffee is good for you; there are plenty of benefits to drinking a cup of joe on a daily basis. So you may wonder why some are seeking alternatives, like alkaline coffee? The marketing game is big on this one. It has a lot to do with the pH in your body, and yet very little to do with sound science.

Caffeine junkies, we know the struggle is real. The risks versus benefits of coffee have been debated for some time, and the latest findings point to good news: Caffeine does not make our hearts flutter, despite popular belief. Oh, be still, my heart!

Watch the video above for more on the highs and lows of coffee.

coffee via shutterstock coffee via shutterstock

In 2013, an estimated 83 percent of Americans drank coffee, according to the National Coffee Association, making the beverage a near-universal favorite in the United States. Coffee is the second most traded commodity on earth. There has been extensive research done to elucidate the risks and/or benefits of coffee for quite some time. And now there are findings supporting the life-extending benefits of the coffee bean.

In a...

coffee cancerIf you were laughing at the notion that sausage is just as carcinogenic as cigarettes, you are not alone the United Nations World Health Organization (WHO) is scrambling to repair the damage to what's left of the credibility of its International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) after its latest paper about processed meat. But that report is...