coffee

The marketing game is big on this one. It has a lot to do with the pH in your body, and yet very little to do with sound science.
Caffeine junkies, we know the struggle is real. The risks versus benefits of coffee have been debated for some time, and the latest findings point to good news: Caffeine does not make our hearts flutter, despite popular belief.
A new study shows an inverse relationship between coffee consumption and death from a variety of causes. This benefit is also seen in decaffeinated coffee, as well as coffee that includes additives, such as cream and sugar. In addition, the health benefit grows as coffee consumption increases up to 4-5 cups per day.
Worried about meat and cancer? You don't need to fret International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), a part of the World Health Organization, is in the health scare business, as its analysis of coffee shows.
To people in science, organic coffee always seemed a little silly, because you don't eat coffee beans any more than you eat the shell of a pineapple, and by the time you do get to the consumable part, whether or not the toxic pesticide on the plant was an organic one or a synthetic one has ceased to be relevant.
Coffee is good for you. No seriously, it really is. No foolin . At least if the science is to be believed.
Coffee seems to be a steaming hot topic in health news these days. Last week we wrote about a study that associated high levels (six cups) of daily coffee intake with reduced risk for multiple sclerosis. And this week, according to a new South Korean study, moderate coffee consumption was associated with a decreased risk of high coronary artery calcium (CAC). Calcium in the walls of the coronary arteries can be an early sign of coronary heart disease.
A new study, released this week and slated to be presented at the American Academy of Neurology meetings in April, found a link between coffee consumption a lot of it and a reduced incidence of multiple sclerosis. It s a pretty slim thread, however.
Activists are attacking Starbucks because its coffee like everyone else s coffee contains acrylamide. This is not because the company actually adds the chemical to its coffee, nor does anyone else it is formed naturally when the beans are roasted.
Scientists have now unraveled and published the genome of a variety of coffee plant called Coffee canephora, which comprises about 30 percent of the world s coffee production.
There have been enough studies on coffee to keep you up at night. We at ACSH have followed and reported on this topic numerous times. Bottom line: Almost without exception, studies have found that coffee consumption is either safe, or frequently, provides various health benefits. So, we would be remiss in not reporting on the latest coffee news that it may improve your long-term memory.
Coffee and its caffeine content have been associated with numerous health effects, not the least of which is diuresis, or loss of body water. Thus, some have advised that caffeinated beverages not be included when estimating how much water a person should be drinking.