dietary supplements

CVS just sent out a mass email patting itself on the back because the pharmacy chain no longer sells cigarettes. That's fine and good. But here's some of the other junk they sell.
It's summer. Lakes and other waterways are warm ... and polluted with phosphorous and nitrogen. These conditions are ideal for overgrowth of blue-green algae. When this happens very potent toxins are released, potent enough to kill dogs. But people also take blue-green algae as a dietary supplement. What gives?
Many of those who want to shove their kids into a lead-lined, basement safe room when someone walks by with a can of Raid or diet soda, are unknowingly feeding them multiple, unknown chemicals by giving them dietary supplements. And virtually none of those are useful -- and some are actually dangerous.
I must be getting old because I don't know who some of these young whippersnappers are anymore. Apparently, a Canadian singer named Grimes (who happens to be dating Elon Musk) is somebody I need to pay attention to. And as is often the case with celebrities, it's not for a good reason. 
Older people often take many supplements, including ones purported to help with brain health. A recent study says the supplements do not work.
Honey doesn't treat erectile dysfunction. If it does, it might be spiked with Viagra.
A dietary supplement spiked with a real prescription drug? Big deal. But one spiked with six different drugs? We're talking some serious effort here. If you're curious why there are six drugs present in a bottle that is supposed to be "natural" and "drug-free," you should be. Welcome to the world of dietary supplements.
Dietary supplement companies are not renowned for their ethical business practices. But 16 companies may have redefined the word "sordid" by peddling useless supplements to Alzheimer's patients and their families. At least they got swatted down by the FDA. But how much did they suck from desperate families before the FDA warning letters went out? And how do these guys sleep at night?
FDA chairman Dr. Scott Gottlieb has warned us once again that sunscreen pills are nothing but a worthless supplement. But, is it possible that he is wrong on this one? Let's see what Mr. Melonhead has to say.
ACSH has made it, big time! We've been accused of supplying fake news! All because we (and other "fake newsers") have spoken out about the many faults of the dietary supplements industry. But the critic, Bill Sardi, thinks cancer can be cured and that vaccinations make kids sicker. This dude has a Home Depot full of loose screws. 
More than a third of kids are using dietary supplements. Due to the many preventable, adverse drug reactions they cause – such as arrhythmias and cardiovascular events – researchers set out to quantify pediatric and adolescent intake.
There's nothing magical about a rattlesnake. Just because rattlesnakes are tough and cool doesn't mean that you'll be tough and cool if you eat them. Instead, you might just be a dope.