dietary supplements

I've written numerous times that when it comes to supplements, you can throw both common sense and science out the window. Up is up and so is down. Somehow, I’ve been laboring under the notion that I don't really have much else to write about this topic. That was until a leisurely stroll up and down the aisles of a CVS store. And an existential thought experiment at no extra cost.
In addition to bottled hope, the $168 billion dietary supplement industry furnishes surplus amino acids, vitamins, minerals and enzymes to those who aren’t extracting the necessary requirements from regular food, drink, and life experiences. Now, we can add negative ions to the list, thanks to ionized, or alkalized, water.
"Doctor" Thomas Cowan, who claimed that 5G caused the coronavirus, isn't surrendering his medical license because he's learned his lesson. Instead, he's watched how other quacks have become millionaires and plans to follow in their footsteps.
GNC, the giant dietary supplement company that has been selling questionable health products for 85 years, apparently had no "remedy" for COVID. The company is filing for bankruptcy, due in large part to the pandemic. A little bit of irony for your Friday.
Some people believe that putting collagen in your coffee will bring good health, but collagen in coffee does nothing good for you.
CVS just sent out a mass email patting itself on the back because the pharmacy chain no longer sells cigarettes. That's fine and good. But here's some of the other junk they sell.
It's summer. Lakes and other waterways are warm ... and polluted with phosphorous and nitrogen. These conditions are ideal for overgrowth of blue-green algae. When this happens very potent toxins are released, potent enough to kill dogs. But people also take blue-green algae as a dietary supplement. What gives?
Many of those who want to shove their kids into a lead-lined, basement safe room when someone walks by with a can of Raid or diet soda, are unknowingly feeding them multiple, unknown chemicals by giving them dietary supplements. And virtually none of those are useful -- and some are actually dangerous.
I must be getting old because I don't know who some of these young whippersnappers are anymore. Apparently, a Canadian singer named Grimes (who happens to be dating Elon Musk) is somebody I need to pay attention to. And as is often the case with celebrities, it's not for a good reason. 
Older people often take many supplements, including ones purported to help with brain health. A recent study says the supplements do not work.
Honey doesn't treat erectile dysfunction. If it does, it might be spiked with Viagra.
A dietary supplement spiked with a real prescription drug? Big deal. But one spiked with six different drugs? We're talking some serious effort here. If you're curious why there are six drugs present in a bottle that is supposed to be "natural" and "drug-free," you should be. Welcome to the world of dietary supplements.