frailty

Human physiology is complex. Homeostasis tells us that our physiologic responses maintain us within a specific range. Fractal physiology tells us that, over time, our responses become less responsive. And those changes can be seen years before clinical disease is apparent.
As our population ages and our medical care improves, we have increasing numbers of frail patients. The frail require gentler, longer, and frequently more expensive care. A new study looks at these outcomes.
A new paper shares a different -- and perhaps, a better way -- of describing the outcome of care. It's more than alive or dead; it's about how much better patients are living their lives.
For the second week in a row, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg telecommuted. Her recovery teaches us about resilience and its partner, frailty.
Bones are not inert objects, but instead living tissue that responds to a host of mechanical forces. So what if the reason some elderly fall and "break" their hip is that – similar to a bridge collapsing from mechanical fatigue – their bones just gave way? 
Frailty helps us identify patients at risk for complications from surgery. But how to "undo" frailty remains a puzzle.