innovation

When it comes to antibiotic research, what does the word "innovation" mean? It's a bit different for antibiotics. Dr. David Shlaes argues that a difference in clinical utility is a better measure, even when a new drug or combination of drugs may be structurally similar to older drugs. This, from his blog "Antibiotics, the Perfect Storm."
More and more frequently, prior scientific work is not "reproducible." But is it a crisis? And does reproducibility lead us to "truth"? A study of how science may find truth discovers that the diversity of scientific approaches may be crucial.
The FDA just announced the approval of a new drug for psoriasis. But it really isn't new at all -- it's a combination of two generic psoriasis drugs in one tube. The price of the tube is interesting and the company involved even more so. Welcome to the world of insanely expensive generics.
With fountain-of-youth and cancer-cure promises galore, what's actually transformative -- and happening now -- might surprise you. The key is where to look.
Despite having yet to save a mouse, last week a company created headlines when it said that it would cure all cancers -- in a year. Let's clarify what promise actually exists in the field, and what hurdles still need to be overcome.
Despite having yet to save the life of a mouse, an Israeli company is making grandiose pronouncements. However, if you look beyond the hype the medical approach is actually pretty interesting.
We count on innovation to improve our lives. In a quest to make innovations come faster we have considered how, and to whom, we entrust research and development. A new study suggests that the rate of innovation is driven mostly by how many simple and complex solutions might be available.
The FDA's current regulatory framework is out of whack -- and it comes at the expense of patient safety. The Wild West of "stem cell" clinics continues. This time, patients are hospitalized with blood infections to spinal abscesses.
Sociologists have studied the diffusion of ideas and knowledge for decades. A new study shows that the eminence of the source has a greater impact than the quality of the idea. That makes the rich richer -- and society poorer.
Though we're often told that with every new digital health product, medication or device, biotech firm or health-system launch how "groundbreaking," "revolutionary" or "disruptive" it is, here's an ongoing medical reality that actually is just those things.
With drones, discovery in science and medicine makes the sky – and now the sea – the limit.
Using data on scientific citations and impact, a group of scientists reflect on what makes for innovative science in the hopes of crafting a formula.