peanuts

Researchers have been working for years to find a means of treating peanut allergy with various degrees of success, as we wrote about here. Unlike allergy to milk and some other foods, peanut allergy doesn't usually disappear on its own as a child grows up. Peanut allergy represents a real risk to life if an allergic individual eats even traces of the allergen and goes into anaphylactic shock. Thus parents of such children face the task of not only eliminating all traces of peanuts from their homes, but also figuring out how to have their child be safe when at school or visitng others' homes.

But hope is on the horizon, as Australian researchers have followed up on their earlier...

Several years ago, a school bus full of elementary students in Massachusetts was evacuated. A potentially deadly item was found on the floor. Was it a gun? A bomb? A blood-contaminated hypodermic needle?

No, it was a peanut.

Over-the-top responses to peanuts aren't uncommon. People are under the impression that the mere whiff of a peanut is enough to send some kids to the emergency room. But, that's simply not true. The molecules in peanuts that are responsible for aroma are not the same as the ones that trigger allergies. Also, an allergic reaction only occurs if...

On my recent flight to New York City, an attendant announced that a passenger had a severe peanut allergy. If any of us had brought food containing peanuts, it was requested that we put it away for the entire flight. I poked fun at this on my Facebook page, after which I was castigated for my insensitivity and lack of compassion.

"It's the recirculated air," one person said.

"It can be ingested through particles circulated in the air," chimed in another.

A teacher weighed in, too: "A child in my class... went in to shock after touching the same door knob that someone who had... peanuts had touched earlier."

No, that's not how it works. The apparently widespread belief that recirculated peanut-tainted air can kill unsuspecting children is based on several...

Dogs love peanut butter— but just because they go nuts over that delicious goodness does not mean every type of nut is safe for your furry friend. We chatted with Dr. Tim Hunt about which common types are safe to feed your pooch!

 

shutterstock_145928273Food allergies can give parents nightmares, especially when their allergic kids are away from home — say, in school or at a friend's house. How can you be sure that your child isn't being fed something that will trigger hives, or worse?

Well, we wrote a while ago about a trial of feeding peanuts to infants at high risk of developing an allergy to them — and it seemed to work. While about 14 percent of the...

peanutsThe war on the P-B and J has been waged in our schools for some time now. Determining how to handle these sandwiches, and peanuts in particular as they relate to students with allergies, has arguably been one of the most heated battles in school systems across the country. It is certainly up there with the decision to teach evolution, or how to provide instruction on sex ed.

As for nuts, so many schools have decided to kowtow to the concerns of a few, banning all peanut products on school grounds. Others, meanwhile have decided to take extra...

1317092_74386703The possible association between nut and peanut consumption and mortality rate in both Caucasian and Chinese individuals was examined by Dr. Hung N. Luu from the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and colleagues. Previous studies had found that the greater the nut consumption, the lower the risk of death from all causes, but that research had primarily been conducted in...

In health news: Plain ole water is getting a makeover new, but not necessarily improved, could nuts be the new powerhouse foods? Some think so, and the world lights it up blue for World Autism Awareness Day.

peanutsIn her latest column in the New York Times, Jane Brody waxes enthusiastic about the nutritional benefits of peanut and tree nut consumption. She cites studies showing that the more nuts people ate, the lower their risk of dying. This was true for rich and poor, as well as for different ethnic groups, she points out. In addition, she also cites a study that found that the...

peanutsEating peanuts (which are actually legumes) was associated with a lower risk for cardiovascular disease and death, according new large study published online in JAMA Internal Medicine. Earlier studies have linked high intake of nuts to reduced risk of mortality, however, most previous studies were conducted among people of European descent and high socioeconomic status.

Dr. Xiao-Ou Shu, MD, PhD, of the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, and coauthors set out to examine the association of nut intake with total and cause-specific mortality in...