thanksgiving

Just as you've been toiling away in preparation for your upcoming feast, we have been toiling away teaching the world about science. Last week, we appeared on the wildly popular Coast to Coast AM and more!
We're entering the danger season — first Thanksgiving, then Christmas and finally New Year's, all in about six weeks. Three chances to wreak havoc with all our good dietary intentions. How bad can it get? Pretty bad — just one holiday dinner can provide more calories than most of us should consume in a day.
Even though Thanksgiving is a wonderful holiday, it doesn't mean that it's not perilous. Dangers lurk everywhere, from nightmarish traffic to my Aunt Wilma's turkey. But perhaps the "biggest" scare of all is the bounty of chemicals you'll be consuming. Can you avoid them? Let's examine a five-course meal and see. 
The rise of the industrial turkey is a story large enough to contain many narratives, which range from the salvation of agriculture to the rise of TV dinners. Indeed, it is a tale of American exceptionalism.
About 1,500 cooking fires occur every Thanksgiving, mostly from deep frying turkeys. While this practice is fairly new, my family was exposed to a very different Thanksgiving hazard many years ago: Aunt Wilma's turkey. Which is worse? Hard to say.
We flipped toy and holiday season safety on its head and chose to be more proactive by focusing on how NOT to hurt kids.  Learn how here.
Traditional Thanksgiving dinner
The average cost of a Thanksgiving dinner for 10 has fallen to under $50, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation, which has tracked U.S. supermarket prices of the traditional bird and related side dishes since 1986. Decline in turkey prices led the way. Roughly 45 million turkeys will be consumed on Thanksgiving Day.
An uptick in catastrophes involving fingers and hands occurs every year as our digits navigate the treacherous time between Halloween and Christmas. Who knew pumpkin carving and opening gifts could be such a minefield? Here's what you need to know.
Your Thanksgiving turkey is a direct descendent of the dinosaur. Scientists have found that the turkey and the chicken have undergone the fewest genetic changes as compared with other birds to their avian ancestor, the dinosaur.
Don't let Thanksgiving flop; make sure your roast your turkey right! Check out our fun (and all-too-common) tips to a successful holiday.
The holidays are challenging for everyone's midsection but they are a factor in the actual obesity rather than seasonal weight gain?
Nearly 60 years ago, the first great chemical carcinogen scare put a damper on many folks' Thanksgiving celebrations. A chemical used in cultivating cranberries in the northwest was found to cause cancer at high doses in rodents, and the Federal health agency advised consumers to avoid cranberries. Utter nonsense, then and now.