type 2 diabetes

The genetic testing company released a new report detailing customer risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. It's better than a coin toss, but not a great screening test. It is medical "edu-tainment." But can it nudge us toward healthier decision making?
Not only does bariatric surgery provide substantial weight loss to the obese, but it can also ameliorate the metabolic derangements of diabetes and decrease their need for medications. And, a new randomized study found, these beneficial results aren't transient — they were still apparent five years post-surgery and were superior to the results of strictly medical treatment.
It used to be that Type 2 diabetes was typically seen in people over 40. But with the obesity epidemic, the age of onset is often lower. A recent study found that bariatric surgery was more effective for both weight loss and remission of the disease in those whose disease had an earlier onset. It provides a good reason not to delay surgery.
A recent study, published in Nature Medicine, demonstrates the role of branched-chain amino acid metabolite, 3-HIB, in the development of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle tissue.
Bariatric surgery is probably the most effective means of dealing with obesity, and with obesity-linked Type 2 diabetes as well. Some questions remain like, how long do benefits last and who should be eligible for this treatment? A couple of new reports shed some light.
A new paper in the New England Journal of Medicine, reported that patients who took Jardiance, a novel hypoglycemic drug that was developed by Boehringer and Lilly, had a 38 percent reduction in cardiovascular deaths. This is the first evidence that a drug that lowers blood sugar has an impact on cardiovascular disease.
A higher BMI may lead to an increased risk for diabetes complications, a new study finds. Using data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS), researchers examined relations between excess weight and time to first diagnosis of type 2 diabetes and its
The benefits of bariatric surgery for weight loss and remission of type 2 diabetes have been studied extensively. However, questions remain as
A report in the September 24 issue of JAMA has some mildly encouraging news regarding the health of the American public. In contrast to the doubling of the incidence and prevalence of diabetes during the years 1990 through 2008, new data indicates that this trend at least in many populations has stabilized.
Past research has demonstrated that tight control of blood glucose levels can help people with type 1 diabetes the ones who must use insulin to avoid some of the negative health consequences of the disease. A new study, published recently in The Lancet, extends the benefits of tight control to patients with type 2 diabetes the more common type usually associated with obesity and overweight.
If not well-controlled, diabetes either type 1 or type 2 can result in a number of debilitating complications. Some or these are due to negative effects on small blood vessels or microvasculature throughout the body. Thus, problems with vessels in the eyes (retinopathy), kidneys (nephropathy) and nervous system (neuropathy), can result in blindness, kidney damage, and/or pain and numbness in the legs and feet, respectively.