vaccination

Mosquitoes transmit a wide variety of nasty microbes, from viruses like dengue, yellow fever and Zika, to parasites like malaria. The sheer number and diversity of diseases transmitted by mosquitoes makes vaccine development a challenge. But what if a vaccine could, instead, target the mosquito?
How can we get more parents to vaccinate their kids? New correspondence in The Lancet may bring us one step closer to an answer, using its analysis of the human papillomavirus vaccination program that began in Ireland in 2010. 
Despite the reality of measles, rotavirus, and a plethora of other infectious diseases, there's yet another anti-vaccine movement afoot in California. And its aim is to turn the clock back to the 10th Century.
Without a doubt, health officials – especially those anonymous doctors and nurses who trek out in the field to remote and sometimes dangerous locations to administer vaccines – are true public servants. They prove that superheroes sometimes don white coats, and carry hypodermic needles.
In spite of anti-vaccine efforts to scare parents, recent CDC data indicates that the overwhelming majority of children entering kindergarten are being appropriately immunized. Using data from 48 states and the District of Columbia, researchers found that a median of over 90 percent of kids are receiving the recommended vaccines.
In infants, whooping cough is horrific. They are especially vulnerable during their first few months, before they can receive their first vaccinations. A new study strengthens the CDC's recommendation: expectant mothers should get the whooping cough vaccine in their third trimester, to transfer protective antibodies to their newborns.
A New York state court judge's ruling, revoking New York City's mandatory flu vaccination for pre-school and young school children, is a counterproductive public health move. Hopefully the state legislature can revise the law to allow the city to require such vaccinations, to protect its youngest kids.
Pertussis, or whooping cough, is one of those vaccine-preventable diseases that have been on the rise, as we pointed out here. That's because of waning immunity and low rates of revaccination, as well as fears of some parents.
As more children and teens become susceptible to whooping cough (pertussis), it becomes more important to protect newborns and infants from contagion transmitted by those age groups. With siblings now transmitting the virus more often than moms, pregnant women need to be vaccinated to insure protection.
In a recent New York Times column, Jane Brody encourages pregnant women to get vaccinated, both for their own health and for the benefit of their newborn babies.
We ve written several times about the Disneyland measles outbreak that occurred earlier this year. A total of 147 people were sickened in the US, and infections also spread to Mexico and Canada. The outbreak once again sparked the debate about vaccinations. With
After a four-hour hearing, California lawmakers approved Senate Bill 277, which prevents most exemptions (opting out) for parents trying to avoid vaccinating their children due to personal beliefs. The bill was proposed in the wake of the Disneyland measles outbreak that began in December. The final vote on the bill was 6-2. However, it must pass through several more hearings before a possible Senate floor vote, and then go through the state Assembly, and then to Gov. Jerry Brown (whose vaccine beliefs are