antibiotics

Dr. David Shlaes has been following the various discussions around the development of rapid diagnostic tests for acute bacterial infections. The ACSH advisor has concluded that broad-spectrum empiric therapy of potentially serious infections in the hospital will continue – and well it should – regardless of the availability of such rapid tests.
The term "opioid" has become a dirty word. "Synthetic" is also dirty. When putting them together you get something that is dirty but also confusing -- and probably intentionally so. There's no scientific reason to categorize a drug as a "synthetic opioid" or a "synthetic anything," as you will read here. To see how silly it is, let's perform the same exercise with antibiotics and see how that works out.
Expert societies, especially the infectious disease pharmacists, should consider making recommendations regarding off-label use of antibiotics. These recommendations should be based on clinical, microbiological, and pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic data. 
A new study shows physicians "over-prescribing" the length of treatment for pneumonia. We seem to restart therapy at discharge.
Whether occupationally, recreationally, or induced by a run-of-the-mill activity, ocular issues involving objects is not rare. And the summer is a prime time for things, propelled by the wind, to land in the eye.
Given the difficulty of discovering new antibiotics to treat resistant bacteria, microbiologists are exploring non-traditional approaches. ACSH advisor Dr. David Shlaes discusses a webinar in which "You couldn’t have a more authoritative and experienced set of presenters."
We don't know if probiotics are a good idea during antibiotic therapy. So eat plenty of fiber -- such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains -- instead.
Triclosan has garnered a bad reputation due to its overuse. But it may still serve a purpose in treating cystic fibrosis infections.
When business models drive medical systems, low-value care ensues. The concern is compounded by the tremendous growth in urgent-care and retail clinics. These facilities are now contributing to 40 percent of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions.
A team of researchers wants patients to shorten their antibiotic course. This suggestion is problematic, and possibly dangerous, both to individuals and the larger battle against antibiotic resistance. And it goes against the recommendations of many organizations.  
Did our lost presidents surpass the life expectancy of their respective generations because of their access to superior medical care? The answer might surprise you.
Baking soda, bicarbonate, is a household staple. Does it have a role in treating sepsis? An in vitro study may point to a new treatment.