antibiotics

When business models drive medical systems, low-value care ensues. The concern is compounded by the tremendous growth in urgent-care and retail clinics. These facilities are now contributing to 40 percent of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions.
A team of researchers wants patients to shorten their antibiotic course. This suggestion is problematic, and possibly dangerous, both to individuals and the larger battle against antibiotic resistance. And it goes against the recommendations of many organizations.  
Did our lost presidents surpass the life expectancy of their respective generations because of their access to superior medical care? The answer might surprise you.
Baking soda, bicarbonate, is a household staple. Does it have a role in treating sepsis? An in vitro study may point to a new treatment.
C-diff is a bacterium that causes a life-threatening infection. Though the bacterium can infect healthy individuals, it is of particular concern to those who are hospitalized or are taking antibiotics.
Truth is stranger than fiction. House of Cards has been cancelled. MSNBC fired journalist Mark Halperin. The long-anticipated Russia investigation has resulted in its first charges. And a dog bit my dad in the butt. What do you do when a dog bites you?
When it comes to finding new antibiotics, no place is too weird to look. Three separate teams of researchers have identified potentially useful antibiotics from some of the strangest places imaginable: Sponges, sea snails, and marine worms.
University of Montana researchers discovered that when grown in co-culture, two different species of the fungus Penicillium – the same genus that produces the antibiotic penicillin – cooperate to synthesize an antibiotic that neither species produces when grown alone.
It's indisputable that we need to develop new antibiotics – and fast. It's also all-but-indisputable that once this gets into the hands of politicians, they will screw it up. They sure did this time. American Council advisor Dr. David Shlaes explains. 
Most motorists, as they glide their cars carefully around the bloody remains, find highway carcasses repulsive. But a team of microbiologists and chemists from the University of Oklahoma hope that roadkill will prove to be a biomedical gold mine.
You never know when you're going to find yourself 2,067 feet underwater off the coast of the Bahamas, looking for a sponge that doesn't exist yet. It's just another day at the office for antibiotic research scientists.
Unlike draping yourself in velvet, which is not socially acceptable, silk remains perfectly fashionable. In fact, it is all the rage at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Tufts University, where a research group led by David Kaplan is literally wrapping silk around everything it can get its hands on.