antibiotics

You never know when you're going to find yourself 2,067 feet underwater off the coast of the Bahamas, looking for a sponge that doesn't exist yet. It's just another day at the office for antibiotic research scientists.
Unlike draping yourself in velvet, which is not socially acceptable, silk remains perfectly fashionable. In fact, it is all the rage at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Tufts University, where a research group led by David Kaplan is literally wrapping silk around everything it can get its hands on.
Far too many antibiotic prescriptions are written for infections that cannot be treated by them. A new study published in JAMA shows how some simple behavioral interventions can change prescribers habits toward more evidence-based prescribing.
There are calls to incentivize antibiotics research. While it is welcome that government again understands the importance of pharmaceutical discovery, it's not that simple.
Some new, alarming information from the World Health Organization shows that we need a better understanding of how to correct the problem of antibiotic-resistant infections in humans. A large, multi-country survey revealed widespread confusion of how antibiotics should be used.
A CDC report card shows that doctors are prescribing antibiotics for flu patients at an alarmingly high rate, a trend that contributes to the spread of antibiotic resistance. However, physicians shouldn't shoulder all the blame, as pushy patients need to be held accountable, too.
The safety of surgical procedures was greatly enhance with the discovery of antibiotics. Today, many procedures involved prophylactic antibiotics to protect against infections. However, according to a new study, the continued growth of antibiotic resistance is threatening to make this practice ineffective.
Bad news from the CDC according to the July 23rd issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, a quarter of Americans expect an antibiotic prescription when they visit the doctor for a cold. Antibiotics do not fight viral infections like the common cold which is a
Back in May, the British government sponsored a review, headed up by former Goldman Sachs chief economist Jim O'Neill, regarding solutions to the antibiotic resistance crisis. O Neill s final report suggested that we de-link profits fr
Acute appendicitis has been the most common surgical emergency causing ER visits since records have been kept. It has been crucial to rapidly differentiate acute AP pain from pain unrelated to an acute, possibly emergency condition. Until now, that is: antibiotics and observation may be an option.
The cranial sinuses are eight cavities within the skull that supply vocal resonance. When they become inflamed, often accompanied by facial pain, fever, and nasal congestion, the condition is called sinusitis. Sinusitis will affect one in eight American adults in their lifetime, and can be caused by an infection from a virus (most commonly), bacteria, or fungus; it can also be the result of an allergic reaction.
An op-ed by family medicine practitioner Victoria Dooley, MD, in today s New York Times discusses the problems engendered when people who say they are allergic to certain antibiotics actually aren t and why this is a deadly problem.