autism

Despite years of research, our understanding of Autism Spectrum Disorder is limited. But the National Institutes of Health is hoping to change that, by awarding $100 million in grants to nine different groups working on various aspects of ASD. 
Glyphosate is perpetually in the news. However, last month was especially busy because various agencies concluded that it either did – or did not – cause cancer or kill butterflies. The herbicide has even been implicated as a cause of autism, but the science is terrible. Perhaps the worst science came out of MIT in 2014 — confusing correlation with causation. A big no-no.
April is autism awareness month and the FDA isn't missing a beat, warning about fraudulent autism treatments – like chelation therapies and detoxifying clay baths. Not only are they expensive, they're completely ineffective. It's time to smoke out these snake oil salesmen who are preying on parents who just want to help their kids. 
New data shows that more than eight in ten Americans "support requiring all healthy schoolchildren to be vaccinated for measles, mumps and rubella." In addition, an overwhelming number of adults – 88 percent – "believe that the benefits of these inoculations outweigh the risks."
If Donald Trump's anti-vaccine tweets were not enough to make the scientific and medical community nervous, there is another reason to be concerned. Very concerned. The president-elect met this week with Robert Kennedy Jr., a vaccine denier and one of the most outspoken proponents of the false claim that vaccines cause autism.
As the anti-vaccine movement garnered Hollywood momentum, science stood largely silent. However, Dr. Paul Offit, inventor of the Rotavirus vaccine, took to the helm to fight for children's health and safety. Here's an informative conversation with a true expert in the field. 
Every time I think that this nightmare might be over, he's back in the news. This time, the rights to the former doctor's 2010 book have recently been acquired, and I fear my nightmare is going to become a Hollywood film. Why are Wakefield's supporters so effective at getting their message out than those on the side of science? In response, what do we need to do?
When Robert De Niro pulled the film “Vaxxed: From Cover-Up to Catastrophe” from the Tribeca Film Festival last month, the scientific community cheered. Then, however, the actor stated in a TV interview that he was not sure that it was the right decision, but made it clear that he wants to learn the truth. Here, we extend an invitation to Mr. De Niro to learn the truth, and to gain an understanding of why we are absolutely sure that there is no link between vaccines and autism.
The details of science how to interpret empirical data are more of a debate than lay people may know and scientists may care to admit, and it is not as cut and dry as the media sometimes present it.
There is a wealth of data that shows an increase in prevalence of autism over the past few decades. There is also a wealth of activities, such as pesticide use and vaccines, that have been blamed for this increase. However, a new study from researchers at Penn State might finally have the answer to the cause of this increase.
It s understandable that parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are eager to find a way to help their kids overcome the problems associated with their conditions
The puzzle that is the cause of Autism is one of the internet s favorite conundrums. A google search into what causes autism will turn up 120 billion hits. Glyphosate and other pesticides are popular choices amongst